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I have an input file with millions of rows and thousands of columns/fields. Can anybody explain to me, why the two awk methods below, which yield the same output, differ so much in terms of CPU run time?

175.0 seconds:

awk 'BEGIN{FS=":| "}NR>1{field1=$1;field2=$2;$1="";$2="";print field1":"field2,field1":"field2,field2,$0}' file_in > file_out

19.7 seconds:

cat file_in | awk 'BEGIN{FS=":"}NR>1{print $1,$2}' | awk '{print $1":"$2,$1":"$2,$0}' | cut -d " " -f 3 --complement > file_out

Here is the 2nd and 3rd line of one file_in with just hundreds of columns/fields (there is no line break between the lines):

1:1000071 C T 1 0 0 1 0 0
1:1000759 C T 1 0 0 0 1 0

Here are the corresponding lines of the file_out:

1:1000071 1:1000071 1000071 C T 1 0 0 1 0 0
1:1000759 1:1000759 1000759 C T 1 0 0 0 1 0
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1st is slower than 2nd? Oh... I thought 2nd would be slower.... –  Kent Feb 17 '13 at 11:06
1  
@Kent string concatenation is slow in awk since it requires calculating the size of the resultant string, finding an area of memory big enough to hold that string, placing the string there, then freeing the original memory area. It's even slower than I/O so it's more efficient to do print a; print b than c=a"\n"b; print c. So recompling $0 by assigning values to fields is probably the culprit here. –  Ed Morton Feb 17 '13 at 11:16

2 Answers 2

These 2 statements:

$1="";$2=""

are causing awk to recompile each record twice. Given millions of rows and thousands of fields on each, I expect that would have an impact.

If you show us a couple of lines of representative sample input and expected output, we can show you how to do it concisely and efficiently.

It LOOKS like all you're doing is converting lines like this:

1:1000071 C T 1 0 ...
1:1000759 C T 1 0 ...

to lines like this:

1:1000071 1:1000071 1000071 C T 1 0 ...
1:1000759 1:1000759 1000759 C T 1 0 ...

if so, all you need to do is:

awk '{x=$1; sub(/[^:]+:/,x" "x" ")}1' file

or since this is a simple substitution on a single line, even sed could handle it:

sed 's/\([^:]*:\)\([^ ]*\)/\1\2 \1\2 \2/' file

Look:

$ cat file
1:1000071 C T 1 0 ...
1:1000759 C T 1 0 ...

$ awk '{x=$1; sub(/[^:]+:/,x" "x" ")}1' file
1:1000071 1:1000071 1000071 C T 1 0 ...
1:1000759 1:1000759 1000759 C T 1 0 ...

$ sed 's/\([^:]*:\)\([^ ]*\)/\1\2 \1\2 \2/' file
1:1000071 1:1000071 1000071 C T 1 0 ...
1:1000759 1:1000759 1000759 C T 1 0 ...

Ah, but I see you mentioned your sample input was from line 2 on so I guess you have a header line or something to skip over. That'd be:

awk 'NR>1{x=$1; sub(/[^:]+:/,x" "x" ");print}' file

sed -n '2,$s/\([^:]*:\)\([^ ]*\)/\1\2 \1\2 \2/p' file

Finally - here's an alternative awk solution that may be more efficient if your lines all start with "1:" as shown in your sample input:

awk 'NR>1{print $1, $1, substr($0,3)}' file
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I added the 2nd and 3rd line of the input and the 1st and the 2nd line of the output to my answer. –  tommy.carstensen Feb 17 '13 at 22:11
    
@tommy.carstensen couldn't you add REPRESENTATIVE input with just 5 or 6 fields rather than lines of a hundred characters so it's a bit easier for us to see what it is you're doing to transform the input to the output? –  Ed Morton Feb 17 '13 at 22:16
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This remains the fastest solution:

  cat file_in | awk 'BEGIN{FS=":"}NR>1{print $1,$2}' | awk '{print $1":"$2,$1":"$2,$0}' | cut -d " " -f 3 --complement > file_out
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