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I think this is a quite common problem, but still I didn't find a satisfactory answer so I'm going to ask myself.

This is a piece of code:

// this is insine OnClickView
TextView status = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.status);
status.setText("Trying to connect to the server...");
try {
    // this opens a socket and send a login request to the server.
    int result = CommunicationManager.login(String email, String password);
    switch (result) {
    case CommunicationManager.SUCCESS:
        // login ok, go on with next screen
        break;
    case CommunicationManager.WRONG_EMAIL:
        status.setTextColor(Color.RED);
        status.setText("Wrong Email!");
        break;
    case CommunicationManager.WRONG_PASSWORD:
        status.setTextColor(Color.RED);
        status.setText("Wrong Password!");
        break;
    }
} catch (CommunicationException e) {
    status.setTextColor(Color.RED);
    status.setText("Unable to estabilish a connection!");
} catch (ProtocolException e) {
    status.setTextColor(Color.RED);
    status.setText("Protocol error!");
}

This is what I would like to achieve:

  1. User click Send button;
  2. status textview shows "Trying to connect to the server...";
  3. UI "waits" for communications to be over;
  4. status textview shows result accordingly.

But instead when user clicks Send button, UI freezes (oddly before status text appears) until communication is done (I tried to connect to an unknown host). A quick fix is to set a socket timeout, but I don't like this kind of solution: UI still freezes and which timeout should be set?

My first thought were Thread obviously, but as you can see I need to return a value, thing that in threading environment doesn't make much sense since threads run independently and asynchronously.

So what I need is definitely that UI waits for the service to be executed but without freezing. By the way it seems to me that waiting for a return value means that UI has to wait for the task to be over, I just would not let it freeze.

I came across AsyncTask but I see two major disadvantages:

  1. it seems to me that is too tightly coupled with UI;
  2. what if I want to execute service with Integer, String and Boolean parameters? Should I extend AsyncTask<Object, Void, Void>?

Both leads to inextensibility.

What can I do to achieve my goal? Please note that another request to the service will be a request for something that could not be ready yet, so I should automatically repeat request every few time (let's say ten minutes). So probably I'll need something I can use with TimerTask, but I'll still need to return a value to UI every time I execute that service (so I can update the status text and let the user know what's going on).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is typical use case while dealing through external communication i.e. HTTP calls.

Best way is to use AsyncTask. To give you answers for your concerns for AsyncTask.

it seems to me that is too tightly coupled with UI;

Here good code design will play a role. You can write you own call back mechanism to get rid of tight coupling. Example can be below.

Create your version for request and response you need for WS call. It can be very simple primitive type or complex type parameters.

class Result{
    //Define more para.

}

class Request{
    //Deinf more para.
}

Write below callback interface.

public interface MyCallBack {
     public void onComplete(Result result);}

Create AsyncTask and get above Interface object in constructor, same object can return Result object.

    class LongRunningTask extends AsyncTask<Request, Integer, Long>{
    private MyCallBack callback;
    public LongRunningTask(MyCallBack callback) {
        super();
        this.callback = callback;
    }
    @Override
    protected Long doInBackground(Request... params) {
        // Perform your back ground task.
        return null;
    }
    @Override
    protected void onPostExecute(Long result) {
        super.onPostExecute(result);            
        callback.onComplete(new Result()); //Here result is dummy but in real it should be contructred from doInBackground() method
    }
}

Now last and important part to implement the interface and call asynctask. I am trying to reuse your code to have better clarity.

public class MainActivity extends Activity implements MyCallBack{

@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
    TextView status = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.status);
    status.setText("Trying to connect to the server...");
}

private void onClick(){
    //Similer to CommunicationManager.login(String email, String password); in your code.
    LongRunningTask longRunningTask = new LongRunningTask(this);
    longRunningTask.execute(new Request());
}

@Override
public void onComplete(Result result) {     
    try {

        int result = result.getStatus 
        switch (result) {
        case CommunicationManager.SUCCESS:
            // login ok, go on with next screen
            break;
        case CommunicationManager.WRONG_EMAIL:
            status.setTextColor(Color.RED);
            status.setText("Wrong Email!");
            break;
        case CommunicationManager.WRONG_PASSWORD:
            status.setTextColor(Color.RED);
            status.setText("Wrong Password!");
            break;
        }
    } catch (CommunicationException e) {
        status.setTextColor(Color.RED);
        status.setText("Unable to estabilish a connection!");
    } catch (ProtocolException e) {
        status.setTextColor(Color.RED);
        status.setText("Protocol error!");
    }
}

what if I want to execute service with Integer, String and Boolean parameters? Should I extend AsyncTask?

First Parameter is any user defined para. In case you need to pass multiple parameters then put them in to form of entity (i.e. - Class). Also, you can pass initial configuration parameter in constructor of AsyncTask i.e. - Communication URL.

Hope it will help.

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Thanks Rajnikant, these are the answers I like to read! You have been very clear and helpful. Just one thing: how Result#getStatus() is supposed to throw exceptions? Please consider also that CommunicationException is checked. –  tmh Feb 18 '13 at 9:38
    
Another thing: I cannot throw any exception from doInBackground(), but something may go wrong when I call longRunningTask.execute() and this would cause a RTE in AsyncThread caused by something that I can actually recover (or at least catch and inform the user). I don't think that catching RuntimeException and investigate using getCause() would be good design :| EDIT: btw I just tried catching RTE, but I cannot (probably because the exception is thrown in another thread). –  tmh Feb 18 '13 at 10:32
    
I would suggest to handle all Communication, business exception in AsyncTask only. Prepare you exception class and bind that with onComplete parameters. Due to customize call back mechanism you can not directly throw an exception but you can handle it by passing that as parameter in onComplete function i.e. - onComplete(Result result, MyException ex); LEt me know. –  Rajnikant Feb 18 '13 at 11:28
    
Might as well inglobe my own exceptions in Result class and delegate Result#getStatus() for throwing, just like in your example. I found a way to go and I think I'll stick with this one. Thanks for your help and for your detailed reply :) –  tmh Feb 18 '13 at 17:42

Use multi threading, do all the communication in a different thread

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Use worker thread, or AsyncTask for doing long-running operations.

Moreover, from Android Honeycomb, system throws exception, if you perform network operations on UI thread.

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