Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Maybe a dummy question, but I need a clear answer to it. Is there any difference at all in the return of any of those functions

int FileExists(const std::string& filename)
{
  ifstream file(filename.c_str());
  return !!file;
}

int FileExists(const std::string& filename)
{
  ifstream file(filename.c_str());
  return file.is_open();
}

So in other words, my question is: does casting the fstream to bool give exactly the same result as fstream::is_open()?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. is_open checks only whether there is an associated file, while a cast to bool also checks whether the file is ready for I/O operations (e.g. the stream is in a good state) (since C++11).

is_open

Checks if the file stream has an associated file.

std::basic_ios::operator bool

Returns true if the stream has no errors occurred and is ready of I/O operations. Specifically, returns !fail().

share|improve this answer
    
So if I understand you correctly, checking whether a file exists should be done using fstream::is_open(), right? –  The Quantum Physicist Feb 17 '13 at 11:15
    
@SamerAfach: Both methods are feasible ways to check whether the file exists. However, only the latter is correct if you want to additionally check whether the stream is in a good state. Stick to the one you like most. –  Zeta Feb 17 '13 at 11:17
    
Actually I don't care if the file is in a good state for I/O. I just want to know whether the file exists. The file could even be not accessible for user permissions stuff, but yet it exists. Which means fstream::is_open() is the safe option in this case, right? –  The Quantum Physicist Feb 17 '13 at 11:20
    
@Samer - No, if the file is not accessible, the open is also likely to fail. –  Bo Persson Feb 17 '13 at 12:44
1  
@SamerAfach: ifstream file("test.txt"); int i; file >> i;. If test.txt exists, is empty and could be opened, file.is_open() is true, but the extraction of an integer failed and !!file is false. Note that a false is_open always implies !!file false. –  Zeta Feb 18 '13 at 0:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.