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I've always thought that if you want to access the nth character in a string called str, then you have to do something like str.charAt(n). Today I was making a little dummy test page and by mistake, I accessed it with str[n] and to my surprise, it returned me the nth character of the string. I threw up this little purpose built page to exhibit this unexpected (to me) behaviour:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<body>
    <script>
        var str = "ABCDEFGH";
        if (str[4] === str.charAt(4)) alert("strings can be indexed directly as if they're arrays");
        var str2 = new String("ABCDEFGH");
        if (str2[4] === str2.charAt(4)) alert("even if they're declared as object type String");
    </script>
</body>
</html>

It wasn't always like this, was it?

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See also this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/5943726/string-charatx-or-stringx –  The Nail Feb 17 '13 at 12:27
    
Grrr, I did search but somehow missed that one. –  Dee2000 Feb 17 '13 at 12:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, that was not always possible.

If you run your code in an old enough browser, IE 7 for example, it won't be able to access the string like that. On those older engines, you'd have to use .charAt(index) instead.

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Good to know, and makes it therefore unusable. It's charAt all the way !! –  Dee2000 Feb 17 '13 at 12:45

There are two ways to access an individual character in a string. The first is the charAt method:

return 'cat'.charAt(1); // returns "a"

The other way is to treat the string as an array-like object, where individual characters correspond to a numerical index:

return 'cat'[1]; // returns "a"

Array-like character access (the second way above) is not part of ECMAScript 3. It is a JavaScript and ECMAScript 5 feature.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/String

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Good to know, and makes it therefore unusable. It's charAt all the way !! –  Dee2000 Feb 17 '13 at 12:44

As long as I can remember, but:

Array-like character access [...] is not part of ECMAScript 3. It is a JavaScript and ECMAScript 5 feature.

(...and not supported in all browsers) See here.

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Good to know, and makes it therefore unusable. It's charAt all the way !! –  Dee2000 Feb 17 '13 at 12:45

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