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I'm trying to learn Memoization of Dynamic Programming and I was watching video on youtube from MIT trying to follow along with it. I don't know how to compare the Nth value to an array.

int[] memo;
public int fib(int n) {
    int f = 0;

    if n is in memo then return memo[n] <----not sure how to code this line.

    if (n<=2) {
        f = 1;
    } else {
        f = fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
    }

    memo[n] = f;
    return f;
}
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are you alllowed to use java API ?? –  PermGenError Feb 17 '13 at 12:57
    
Note that the concept is called memoization (no "r"). I've edited your question accordingly. –  stakx Feb 17 '13 at 13:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Doing it with ArrayList:

ArrayList<Integer> memo = new ArrayList<Integer>();

public int fib(int n) {
    if (memo.size() == 0)
       memo.add(0); // element 0 is never accessed
    fib2(n);
}

private int fib2(int n) {
    int f = 0;

    if (n < memo.size())
       return memo.get(n);

    if (n<=2) {
        f = 1;
    } else {
       f = fib2(n-2) + fib2(n-1);
    }

    memo.add(f); // elements inserted in order
    return f;
}

Doing it with array:

int[] memo;

public int fib(int n) {
    memo = new int[n]; // all initialized to 0
    fib2(n);
}

private int fib2(int n) {
    int f = 0;

    if (memo[n] != 0)
       return memo[n];

    if (n<=2) {
        f = 1;
    } else {
        f = fib2(n-2) + fib2(n-1);
    }

    memo[n] = f;
    return f;
}
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I am getting an error with nullPointerException with your array. For the arraylist the number are coming out not right past fib(5). –  JavaStudent Feb 17 '13 at 13:27
    
@JavaStudent For array - You probably didn't have a second function such as fib above which constructs memo and calls the original function. For ArrayList - Seems to print correctly on my machine. Did you check what the values should be? –  Dukeling Feb 17 '13 at 13:31
    
Ok I see where my number did wrong. If I didn't add the memo.add(0), then after fib(6) the number would jump from 1,1,2,3,5,7,19,21,50. Why would we need to add(0) if we aren't going to use it? –  JavaStudent Feb 17 '13 at 13:45
    
@JavaStudent Because memo.get(n) = fib(n) (and fib(0) is 0 but never calculated or used with this algorithm). One could also remove memo.add(0) and have memo[n-1] = fib(n) (with applicable changes). –  Dukeling Feb 17 '13 at 13:49

You can initialize your memo array with -1 values since the algorithm will never insert-1 in the array.

So checking if memo[i] has already been inserted means you have to check if memo[i] != -1.

NB: the concept is actually called memoization

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Why not just leave it as the default value of 0? No initialized value in the array will ever be 0. –  Dukeling Feb 17 '13 at 13:01
    
You can use Arrays.fill for this. –  Boris the Spider Feb 17 '13 at 13:01
    
@Dukeling you can leave 0, but you usually actively set a dummy value, even if that value is 0 so that there is no ambiguity. It is especially useful if there is a bug in your algorithm or forgot a step. –  Jean Logeart Feb 17 '13 at 13:05

You can't compare an array to a single element.

What you probably want is, supposing you have a -1 dummy value for uncomputed values:

if (memo[n] != -1) return memo[n]

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