Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use upper_bound on a vector<pair<int,int>>, like this :

vector<pair<int,int>> data;
auto up = upper_bound(data.begin(), data.end(), 0);

VS2012 gives me the following error :

error C2784: 'bool std::operator <(const std::vector<_Ty,_Alloc> &,const std::vector<_Ty,_Alloc> &)' : could not deduce template argument for 'const std::vector<_Ty,_Alloc> &' from 'const int'

why is it trying to compare a const int with a pair<int,int> ?

I tried writing my own comparison function, but it doesn't change anything. The compiler tries to convert a pair<int,int> into a const int if I do that.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Lightness Races in Orbit, Shai, Mario, Frank Shearar, Emil Vikström Feb 17 '13 at 21:19

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
In this call upper_bound(data.begin(), data.end(), 0); the last parameter is obviously a number. Show your comparator. –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 17 '13 at 14:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are comparing a pair with a number, there is no predefined comparison operator for that. You might want to change it into something like this:

auto up = upper_bound(data.begin(), data.end(), make_pair(0, 0));

Alternatively, if there is a specific logic in your application for comparing a pair with a single number, you can provide your own comparison function:

bool cmp(int n, pair<int, int> const& p)
{
    // For instance...
    return ((p.first < n) && (p.second < n));
}

int main()
{
    vector<pair<int,int>> data;
    auto up = upper_bound(data.begin(), data.end(), 0, cmp);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't that precisely equivalent? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 17 '13 at 14:31
    
haha, I've been looking for complex stuff for an hour but it never occurred to me to even look at the parameters (I just put 0 to do some test). Sorry about the question, I'm embarrassed now ! –  user1278743 Feb 17 '13 at 14:31
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Yes, it is. The "For instance..." there is meant to state that it could be changed. –  Andy Prowl Feb 17 '13 at 14:32
    
@AndyProwl: lol ok... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 17 '13 at 14:40

why is it trying to compare a const int with a pair ?

Because you told it to. Your comparison value is 0, but your element type is pair<int,int>.

Duh doy!

Perhaps you're looking for:

auto up = upper_bound(data.begin(), data.end(), make_pair(0, 0));
share|improve this answer

The third argument to std::upper_bound is the value that the element pointed to by the returned iterator should be greater than. How would you determine whether an std::pair<int,int> is greater than 0 or not?

What you pass should almost certainly be a std::pair<int,int>:

auto up = upper_bound(data.begin(), data.end(), std::make_pair(first, second));

However, first and second depend on the problem you're trying to solve.

share|improve this answer
    
Depends. It may absolutely make sense to search for a number. In fact, I have this exact use-case (I’m searching for intervals which contain a point on a line). –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 17 '13 at 14:28
    
Sounds kinda hinky. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 17 '13 at 14:30
    
@Light No, why? The sorted-array search algorithms in the standard library are explicitly designed with this use-case in mind (look at the documentation of the comparison function). It’s a legitimate use, and actually a pretty common one – it’s an easy and efficient way of representing a collection of ranges. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 17 '13 at 14:34
    
@Konrad: Whatevs! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 17 '13 at 14:43

If you are searching for an incompatible type you need to take special care in your comparison function. Quoting from cppreference.com:

The signature of the comparison function should be equivalent to the following:

bool cmp(const Type1 &a, const Type2 &b);

[…] The type Type1 must be such that an object of type T can be implicitly converted to Type1. The type Type2 must be such that an object of type ForwardIt can be dereferenced and then implicitly converted to Type2.​

– In your case, Type1 = int and Type2 = std::pair<int, int>. That should do the trick.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.