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I am trying to find a user's overdue invoices:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  def overdue_invoices
    invoices.where("overdue = ?", true)
  end
end

class Invoice < ActiveRecord::Base
  def overdue
    balance > 0 && Date.today > due_date
  end
end

The problem seems to be that overdue is a method on the Invoice model, not a database column.

How can I retrieve those records anyway? And does that even make sense or would it be better to store those true and false values in the database?

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2  
What does the Invoice#overdue method look like? –  Andrew Marshall Feb 17 '13 at 14:49
    
Just added it above. balance is actually a database column. –  Tintin81 Feb 17 '13 at 15:11
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should create an equivalent class method or scope for overdue on Invoice:

class Invoice < ActiveRecord::Base
  def self.overdue
    where('balance > 0').where('? > due_date', Date.today)
  end
end

Then you can call overdue on an Invoice relation:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  def overdue_invoices
    invoices.overdue
  end
end

Note that I’m assuming due_date is a database column, if it’s not, you cannot use this method—however, you may be able to replace it with SQL to calculate the due date from data that is in columns.

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Thank, Andrew! That works really well. I have to read up on the concept of self now because I am not entirely sure yet why you added it to the overdue method. –  Tintin81 Feb 17 '13 at 16:47
    
def self.______ defines a class level method instead of a instance method. railstips.org/blog/archives/2009/05/11/… is a good writeup. –  Jason Noble Feb 18 '13 at 5:30
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