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I have the following code:

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Class1 myClass = new Class1("ttt");
        myClass.Name = "xxx";
        MessageBox.Show(myClass.Name);
    }

and

class Class1
{
    string str = "";

    public Class1(string name)   
    {
        str = name;
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get { return str; }
        set;

    }
}

Initially I set:

  myClass.Name = "ccc";

but later changed it to:

  myClass.Name = "xxx";

and also changed:

  set {str = value;}

to:

  set;

Why when I run it do I get "ccc" instead of "xxx" ?

In my current code there is "ccc".

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2  
It's very confusing showing the changes. Just post what your current code is - ideally as a short but complete program. –  Jon Skeet Feb 17 '13 at 14:50
    
And this code actually compiles??? –  leppie Feb 17 '13 at 14:50
    
set; has no action associated with it. It does nothing. {str = value;} is the part that actually sets your property. Undeletable. –  Brad Feb 17 '13 at 14:51
1  
fix your compile errors. Your IDE probably asked you if you want to run the last known working configuration. Fix the compile errors as I suggested below –  bas Feb 17 '13 at 14:55

3 Answers 3

public string Name
{
    get { return str; }
    set;

}

should be

public string Name
{
    get { return str; }
    set { str = value; }
}
share|improve this answer

Change your Name property as follows:

public string Name
{
    get { return str; }
    set { str = value; }
}

To answer your question, the reason why you get "ccc" instead of "xxx" is that you have compile errors. When you run your application it will ask you if you want to run the latest known working configuration. The last time your program did compile, you used "ccc" as literal, and that is what is still running.

Fix the compile errors and run it again, and then it will be "xxx"

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The pattern

public string Name {get;set;}

is what is called "Auto-Implemented Properties".

The compilier creates a private, anonymous backing field that can only be accessed through the property's get and set accessors.

What you original code seems to be doing is get on a field you defined but a set on the anonymous backing field. Therefore build error ...

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