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In COBOL i want to read a line sequential file. The first line occurs one time. The second and the thirth line can be repeated multiple (unknown) times. I really don't know how to do it.

I think the file description is something like this:

01 DBGEGEVENS            PIC X(200).
01 PROJECT. (occurs unknown times)
   03 PROJECTCODE        PIC X(10).
   03 CSVPAD             PIC X(200).
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1  
It is difficult to provide some sort of an answer if we don't know what you want to do. If you just want to process different types of records, you read them (they will be in the 01(s) under your FD for the file) and process them on identification of the type. If you need to keep records which relate to each other, you identify them and store them in Working-Storage. If you need all of them at once, you have to define a table. You might not know the actual number each time, but you should know a reasonable maximum. So, a little more information please. – Bill Woodger Feb 17 '13 at 15:13
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It depends on the file format

Do you want a VB file format ???? then

   FILE-CONTROL.
       SELECT In-File ASSIGN .....
   DATA             DIVISION.
   FILE             SECTION.
   FD  Comp-File.
    01  DBGEGEVENS            PIC X(200).
    01  PROJECT. 
        03 PROJECTCODE        PIC X(10).
        03 CSVPAD             PIC X(200).

with

    Read In-File
    Read In-File
    Read In-File

You would use DBGEGEVENS for the first record and project for secon or subsquent records

For Fixed width file format

   FILE-CONTROL.
       SELECT Comp-File ASSIGN .....
   DATA             DIVISION.
   FILE             SECTION.
   FD  Comp-File.
   01  input-record.

   WORKING-STORAGE  SECTION.
    01  DBGEGEVENS            PIC X(200).
    01  PROJECT. 
        03 PROJECTCODE        PIC X(10).
        03 CSVPAD             PIC X(200).

with

    Read In-File into DBGEGEVENS
    Read In-File into PROJECT.
    Read In-File into PROJECT.

Either should work, depending on which file format you use

share|improve this answer
    
Why would you code differently for "fixed" or "variable" records? Either method for either type of record would work in the abstract (as in not knowing what is actually required for the task). File is "Line Sequential" anyway. – Bill Woodger Feb 18 '13 at 7:59
    
I've always liked the Working Storage version, as there are probably fields in the header that the program needs to reference as it processes the other records. – Gilbert Le Blanc Feb 19 '13 at 14:56
    
Bruce, turned it out was a question on "how should I read a file when there is more than one type of record", so yours gives good coverage. Gilbert, read the file. If it is a header, store it. Otherwise use it where it is. Saves a quantity of CPU depending on how the records are defined, and how many on the file. However, some things do require that the data be anywhere but the FILE SECTION, but becomes a "no brainer" then. – Bill Woodger Feb 20 '13 at 10:40

The code given indicates a VB file - record one is 200 bytes, while the other records are 210 bytes. There should be an indicator on the records that describes what they are and their purpose. Ultimately, you'd be best served by reading them into WORKING-STORAGE - and I'd ask whomever is passing you the file what indicators are available. If, however, you know for a fact that record one is the only 200 byte record in the file, that would be treated as a header read - read once into its definition - while the remaining 210 byte records (and I want to emphasize the definition provided describes 210 bytes) would be read into a WORKING-STORAGE area fitting their definition.

share|improve this answer
    
It is neither VB nor FB, but LINE SEQUENTIAL, as stated in the question. – Bill Woodger Feb 20 '13 at 11:27

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