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I'm making a game using HTML5 canvas. I have a large spritesheet which contains every sprite I'll need within the game. I have read a bit on what might be the best preloading asset technique, and I haven't found anything concrete.

So, I decided I'll just choose one technique: CSS spritesheets. I've used http://www.spritecow.com/ where I've loaded the spritesheet.gif file and generated the CSS code. The thing is that I couldn't find any tutorials on how to actually USE the individual sprites within javascript and the canvas element!

Can someone give me a hand? If you know any other preloading technique or library that is better (can preload images and sounds, if possible).

EDIT: A solution with jQuery is fine too.

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Are you asking about how to preload the spritesheet or how to apply it to elements? –  Roy Feb 17 '13 at 15:00
    
Hmm. Both, I think. I want to use it within the canvas. –  Howie Feb 17 '13 at 15:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Preloading:

A sprite sheet is just an image, so preload like you would any other image. That said, a "jQuery way" would be: var $mySprite = $("<img>").attr("src", "myURL");

(Source: Preload a spritesheet using Jquery)

Applying to elements:

No need to use javascript as this can be done with simple css.

1 - Add a sprite class to every element that uses the spritesheet:

html: <div class="sprite">

css: .sprite { background-image:url("your spritesheet url here") }

2 - Add ids to your elements, and then matching css background-position rules, according to the location of the specific element's image on the spritesheet. e.g.

html: <div class="sprite" id="fire"></div>

css:

#fire {
  background-position: -100px -50px;
  height: 20px;
  width:  40px;
}
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