Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<sys/types.h>
#include<sys/stat.h>
#include<fcntl.h>
#include<errno.h>
int main()
{
   printf("abcd");
   fork ();
   printf("pqrs\n");
   return 0;
}

This program gives the output as follows:

abcdpqrs
abcdpqrs

But how is it possible? Shouldn't it be:

abcdpqrs
pqrs
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Mat, Celada, Blue Moon, Daniel Fischer, Graviton Feb 25 '13 at 3:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

No

it's because fork also copies the datastructure used in printf, holding the buffer to be printed out.

If you fork the program, the buffer is not flushed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot!!! –  Nikhil Feb 17 '13 at 15:57

printf does not necessarily flush stdout immediately, so what happens is that "abcd" is buffered until next output is executed. Since later both "sides" of the fork do the output, both will also flush out the "abcd".

To make it work the way you're probably guessing it would, try flushing manually;

int main()
{

   printf("abcd");
   fflush(stdout);
   fork ();
   printf("pqrs\n");
   return 0;
}

$ ./a.out 
abcdpqrs
pqrs
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lott!! –  Nikhil Feb 17 '13 at 15:57

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.