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I'm using MVC4 Razor to render a simple web page and would like to know if there is an easy way to render a "translated" value using DisplayFor instead of displaying the model's ID value.

Model:

public class Property
{
    [Key]
    public int Rec_Id { get; set; }
    public string Name  { get; set; }
    public int TypeId  { get; set; }
}

public class Type
{
    public int TypeId  { get; set; }
    public string TypeName  { get; set; }
}

Controller:

public ActionResult Index()
{
    PropertyContext db = new PropertyContext();
    Property model = db.Property.Find(94284);
    ViewBag.cmbType = db.Type.ToList();
    return View(model);
}

View

<div class="display-field">
    @Html.DisplayFor(ViewBag.Type => ViewBag.Type.Find(model.Type).TypeName)
</div>
share|improve this question
    
ViewBag.Type => ViewBag.Type.Find(model.Type).TypeName - what's this? – Darin Dimitrov Feb 17 '13 at 16:10

I would recommend you using a view model because your domain model is not adapted to the requirements of your view in which you need to display the type name:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public int RecId { get; set; }
    public string Name  { get; set; }
    public string TypeName { get; set; }
}

and then have your controller action populate this view model by performing an INNER JOIN and pass it to the view:

public ActionResult Index()
{
    using (PropertyContext db = new PropertyContext())
    {
        var query = 
            from prop in db.Property.Find(94284)
            join type in db.Type on prop.TypeId equals type.TypeId
            select new MyViewModel
            {
                RecId = prop.Rec_Id,
                Name = prop.Name,
                TypeName = type.TypeName
            };

        var viewModel = query.FirstOrDefault();
        return View(viewMode);
    }
}

and finally your view will be strongly typed to the view model and you will have all the necessary information you want to display:

@model MyViewModel
...
<div class="display-field">
    @Html.DisplayFor(model => model.TypeName)
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
I would challenge this. As far as we can tell in this particular example, there doesn't seem to be a need for additional overhead of a viewmodel. Instead, I would propose he introduce a data access layer that maps from his data context to a model that he can then use to bind to the view. This preserves classic MVC architecture and will allow for re-usability for DAL code that can be perpetuated to other controllers/actions. That said, I do think your solution is a step in the right direction. – David L Feb 17 '13 at 16:19
    
Instead, I would propose he introduce a data access layer that maps from his data context to a model that he can then use to bind to the view - completely disagree with that. You should never put view specific models into your data access layer. This way you are tightly coupling your DAL with your views making their reusability questionable. The right approach is to have view models that are specifically bound to the views part of the MVC application. – Darin Dimitrov Feb 17 '13 at 16:20
    
Perhaps what I have a problem with is just naming convention :). I like to think of view models as areas that perform manipulations upon data to shape it, not just a mapping of the said data. Your view model is perhaps a very simple view model that could be called something else :P And fair enough, you can avoid the tight coupling. I just cringe when I see data access being performed in a controller action – David L Feb 17 '13 at 16:23
    
The naming is not important here. What you are proposing is to put view specific things (such as the TypeName) into the DAL which I disagree. – Darin Dimitrov Feb 17 '13 at 16:24
    
I missed TypeName the first time around. In that case, I rescind my objection. No reason to allow that into the DAL – David L Feb 17 '13 at 16:25

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