Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does the following piece of code write B2 first and A1 then? Shouldn't it write both A1? Implicit datatype in C++ converts from signed int to unsigned int (higher in hierarchy)

short a=-5;
unsigned short b=-5u;
if(a==b)
    printf("A1");
else
    printf("B2");
// prints B2

int a2=-5;
unsigned int b2=-5u;
if(a2==b2)
    printf("A1");
else
    printf("B2");
return 0;

// prints A1
share|improve this question
3  
Shorts are promoted to ints. –  Kerrek SB Feb 17 '13 at 17:33
1  
I changed "casting" to "converting" in the title. There are no casts in this code; the question is about conversions. –  Pete Becker Feb 17 '13 at 17:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Casting negative signed integral type into unsigned always underflows and it yields modulo arithmetic. unsigned int x = (unsigned int)-1 stores UINT_MAX into x.

Example:

unsigned int x = (unsigned int) -1;
std::cout << x << std::endl;
x = (unsigned int) -5;
std::cout << x << std::endl;

outputs:

4294967295
4294967291

Note that both -1 and -5 have been converted into extremely high values, whose difference is equal to 4 as well.

share|improve this answer

for the given code

short a=-5;
unsigned short b=-5u;
if(a==b)
    printf("A1");
else
    printf("B2");

for an implementation where sizeof(short) < sizeof(int), when a is promoted to int you get the -5 value preserved, and when b is promoted to int you get the 2k - 5 value preserved, where k is the number of value representation bits in an unsigned short.

so, as int they're different, even though they may be the same short size bitpatterns.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.