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Given the following code (http://liveworkspace.org/code/5oact):

class Foo
 {
     public:
         Foo()
         {
             log(__PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
         }
         Foo(const Foo& other)
         {
             log(__PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
         }
         Foo& operator=(const Foo& other)
         {
             log(__PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
             return *this;
         }
         Foo(Foo&& other) noexcept
         {
             log(__PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
         }
         Foo& operator=(Foo&& other) noexcept
         {
             log(__PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
             return *this;
         }
         ~Foo(){}
 };

Using the class like this:

std::vector<Foo> tt;

tt.emplace_back();
tt.emplace_back();
tt.emplace_back();
tt.emplace_back();

I get the following output:

Foo::Foo()
Foo::Foo()
Foo::Foo(const Foo&)
Foo::Foo()
Foo::Foo(const Foo&)
Foo::Foo(const Foo&)
Foo::Foo()

and if I remove the custom destructor I get the following output:

Foo::Foo()
Foo::Foo()
Foo::Foo(Foo&&)
Foo::Foo()
Foo::Foo(Foo&&)
Foo::Foo(Foo&&)
Foo::Foo()

Why the compiler uses the copy constructor instead of the move when I declare a destructor? I understand that the move operation can't throw (and if I remove the noexcept from the code, the compiler won't use it at all), but what the destructor has to do with that?

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2  
A non-noexcept destructor has the same problem as a non-noexcept move constructor - you may throw when half the state is moved over, and you're screwed. See this. –  Xeo Feb 17 '13 at 19:04
1  
@Xeo: Aren't destructors noexcept by default? –  K-ballo Feb 17 '13 at 19:05
1  
@Xeo: I was under the impression that an explicit constructor with no explicit noexcept specification would be declared as if it had the noexcept(true) specification. Did that proposal never made it? –  K-ballo Feb 17 '13 at 19:12
2  
@Xeo: The important standard bit is 12.4.3, which says that a destructor with no explicit exception specification has the some exception specification that an implicitly declared destructor. –  K-ballo Feb 17 '13 at 19:17
2  
@MooingDuck: His explicit destructor happens to be noexcept, this seems to be a compiler issue. –  K-ballo Feb 17 '13 at 19:18
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, it seems that there is an issue with your compiler that uses the wrong noexcept specification. According to the standard, 12.4.3:

A declaration of a destructor that does not have an exception-specification is implicitly considered to have the same exception-specification as an implicit declaration

An implicit declaration of a destructor would be noexcept if all the members and bases' destructors are noexcept as well. So your explicit destructor declaration should be equivalent to:

~Foo() noexcept {} // or:
~Foo() noexcept(true) {}

but instead your compiler is treating it as:

~Foo() noexcept(false) {}

Second, the reason the exception-specification of a destructor affects the decision on whether to move or not is because destruction is involved in the operation. Just as noexcept on a move-constructor and a move-assignment operation affect the decision, move won't be used if there is a possibility that an exception might be thrown mid-process.

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