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I have question ArrayList's remove() method. I want to make if I'm using it correctly. So i have an ArrayList of objects and I'm want to remove a particular object from the Arraylist. Is bool remove(obj) the correct method to use? As I understand it, the remove method compares objects based on the equals method. If the object is a user defined class and the equals method is not overridden, then it should compare objects using == which is comparing addresses rather than content? In this case it would be appropriate to compare addresses rather than content and therefore the remove method is the correct way to remove a particular object from the ArrayList.

Is my understanding correct?

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closed as not a real question by Brian Roach, Bohemian, Sean Owen, Soner Gönül, Stony Feb 18 '13 at 0:01

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
You could try and find out ;) –  jlordo Feb 17 '13 at 20:36
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is the correct method to use if you know the object - you cannot use it when iterating!. You will get a ConcurrentModificationException.
If you want to remove elements when iterating you need to use the Iterator

final Iterator<Something> listIter = arrayList.iterator();
while(listIter.hasNext()) {
  final Something thing = listIter.next();
  if(someTest) {
    listIter.remove();
  }
}
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As I understand it, the remove method compares objects based on the equals method. If the object is a user defined class and the equals method is not overridden, then it should compare objects using == which is comparing addresses rather than content?

if you don't override your equals() it will use default equals from class Object

and which compares reference

 public boolean equals(Object obj) {
   return (this == obj);
 }

If your class is not direct sub class of Object it will use the overridden equals()

For example:

Object
|
|--Animal (overrides `equals()`)
    |
    |
  Human (Doesn't override `equals()`, it will use `Animal`'s version of `equals()` not `Object`'s
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1  
Which compares reference addresses ... –  Brian Roach Feb 17 '13 at 20:36
    
@Brian yes that is true –  Jigar Joshi Feb 17 '13 at 20:38
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