Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I do have the following setup:

    var LayerItemView = Backbone.Marionette.ItemView.extend({

    tagName: 'li',
    className: 'stage-layer',
    template: '#layer-item-tpl',

    initialize: function() {
           $(this.el).attr('id' 'layer-'+this.model.id);
    },

    onRender: function() {
    App.vent.trigger('layer:rendered', this.model);
    }

});

As I believed, the DOM element layer-[id] should now be available. The eventHandler then creates a Raphael canvas for each model to the newly created DOM elements like so:

var paper1 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-1'), 896,504);  
var paper2 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-2'), 896,504);  
var paper3 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-3'), 896,504);  
etc.

But I get an error back from Raphael: Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'x' of undefined

which tells me the elements with layer-ids are not yet available in the DOM. I solve the problem with a simple setTimeout (kind of does this):

setTimeout(function() {
  var paper1 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-1'), 896,504);  
  var paper2 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-2'), 896,504);  
  var paper3 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-3'), 896,504);    
},0);

I don't feel comfortable with this. Could it be right practice? I would like to understand why this is working and whether it is good practice

share|improve this question
2  
How is the code called? Stick it into a $(document).ready(function(){});. –  Boris the Spider Feb 17 '13 at 21:56
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This code is deceiving because at first glance someone might think that

var paper1 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-1'), 896,504);  
var paper2 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-2'), 896,504);  
var paper3 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-3'), 896,504); 

and

setTimeout(function() {
  var paper1 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-1'), 896,504);  
  var paper2 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-2'), 896,504);  
  var paper3 = new Raphael(document.getElementById('layer-3'), 896,504);    
},0);

are the same. When, in actuality they're very different.

What makes these two blocks of code different is a consequence of Javascript being a single-threaded language. Any setTimeout functions created are not called exactly when the timer reaches 0 in setTimeout. It will be executed, approximately, in that time frame. First Javascript will continue executing the current block of code that it's in.

So setTimeout in your situation, is being executed after the thread is finished in the current block of code that its in.

A good reference, and a lot more detailed information, is available here. Written by John Resig (jQuery).

share|improve this answer
    
So is it good practice what I do? –  lunacafu Feb 17 '13 at 22:28
    
No, its not good practice because its a sort of unexpected result. It's difficult to determine exactly when that function is executed since it is put into the Javascript 'queue' thus executed when the current block of code is finished. Don't you think that would make it difficult to debug later or even for another programmer to figure out what's going on. I think you just need to declare those 'papers', somewhere else in your code. Try cutting and pasting into different parts of the code to find out where it is accessible; IMO you're declaring it in the wrong place in your code. –  Klik Feb 17 '13 at 22:48
    
Oh, and as bmorris suggested, you could try putting the code in $(document).ready(function(){}); If you have found this helpful/answer your question, feel free to mark as an answer. Just saying. :) –  Klik Feb 17 '13 at 23:48
    
$(document).ready(function(){}) does not make any difference, still get the Error back –  lunacafu Feb 18 '13 at 3:58
1  
The reason this happens: In CreatorApp.initSubApp you call MyApp.CreatorApp.PaperList.showPapers(CreatorApp.Papers) which, should render the papers to the document, at least that's what you're probably thinking. What happens is rather that the functions for 'PaperList' are called: initialize() and onRender() before that showPapers function is called. In the onRender() you have created a trigger event. The function in app.js fires, directing the thread to createPapers before they have been effectively rendered to the page. My suggestion: put the rendering code in onRender() –  Klik Feb 19 '13 at 0:46
show 3 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.