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I'm looking for a way to change hex to an integer using tail recursion. So far I've only tried terrible implementations of regular primitive recursion and I haven't even gotten close. Very frustrated. Even examples of tail recursion will help and be greatly appreciated. I don't quite understand it well enough for this implementation.

Example:

"005" -> 5

"1E" -> 30

Restrictions: Cannot use imports or if, then, else etc, must be done with recursion if possible or tail recursion.

My attempt at recursion.

    hexToInteger :: String -> Integer
        |(x:xs) = []        = []
        |x == 0             = hexToInteger xs
        |otherwise          = addition x + hexToInteger xs

    addition :: String -> Integer
    addition x 
        |--something to check what position we're dealing with and what hex value.
        |--Return the Integer value
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What did you try? Is it a homework? –  Yuras Feb 17 '13 at 21:58
    
So far I've only tried terrible implementations of regular primitive recursion and I haven't even gotten close. Very frustrated.Even examples of tail recursion will help. I don't quite understand it well enough for this implementation. Edit: I'll put this in the description. –  john stamos Feb 17 '13 at 22:01
1  
Can you implement non-tail recursive solution? It could be good starting point. –  Yuras Feb 17 '13 at 22:08
1  
hexadecimal won't always start with a '0' then you will have more than one case to manage, and i guess the recursion part is not the harden one. Please post your code. You can't say "this is what I want and how I require to be done (restriction)". But You said "I'm not sure how to use recursion taking different values of hex to add them together without using a huge charmap which is also not allowed" Its a good start, may be its the question you have to ask about and provide a little example and I'm sure you'll be helped a lot. –  zurgl Feb 17 '13 at 22:41
1  
Help slightly?? –  john stamos Feb 17 '13 at 22:58

2 Answers 2

Generally, for tail-recursive functions, you need an accumulator argument -- with purity, the result could otherwise only depend on the base case reached. So you would need a helper function taking also an accumulator argument, and call that with an initial value for the accumulator,

hexToInteger :: String -> Integer
hexToInteger string = hexToIntegerHelper initialAccumulator string

and you must find out

  • what initial value you should pass for the accumulator
  • how the accumulator has to be updated in each step.

For example, a tail-recursive implementation of reverse is

reverse :: [a] -> [a]
reverse xs = reverseHelper [] xs

reverseHelper :: [a] -> [a] -> [a]
reverseHelper accumulator [] = accumulator
reverseHelper accumulator (x:xs) = reverseHelper (x:accumulator) xs

and a tail-recursive factorial (fudging the case of a negative argument)

factorial :: Integer -> Integer
factorial n = factorialHelper 1 n

factorialHelper :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer
factorialHelper accumulator n
    | n < 2     = accumulator
    | otherwise = factorialHelper (n*accumulator) (n-1)

So you can see the general structure of hexToIntegerHelper,

hexToIntegerHelper :: Integer -> String -> Integer
hexToIntegerHelper accumulator "" = accumulator
hexToIntegerHelper accumulator (d:ds) = hexToIntegerHelper (newAccumulatorFrom accumulator d) ds

and the question is how the new accumulator is to be computed from the old one and the hexadecimal digit (and what the initial accumulator should be).

For the updating of the accumulator,

digitToInt :: Char -> Int

from Data.Char could be useful, that handles all hexadecimal digits. But, it doesn't return the desired type, so you'd need to use a fromIntegral or a toInteger to convert the Int to Integer.

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Here are two recursive functions, although it has been pointed out to me that they are not tail recursive. Maybe they can help you get there, though.

hexToInteger :: String -> Integer
hexToInteger [] = 0
hexToInteger str = 
  fromIntegral z + 16 * hexToInteger (init str)
    where z = let y = last str 
              in if y >= 'A' && y <= 'Z' 
                    then fromEnum y - 55 
                    else if y >= 'a' && y <= 'z'
                            then fromEnum y - 87
                            else fromEnum y - 48



hexToInteger :: String -> Integer
hexToInteger [] = 0
hexToInteger str = 
  z + 16 * hexToInteger (init str)
    where z = case last str of 
                '0' -> 0 
                '1' -> 1 
                '2' -> 2 
                '3' -> 3 
                '4' -> 4 
                '5' -> 5 
                '6' -> 6 
                '7' -> 7 
                '8' -> 8 
                '9' -> 9 
                'A' -> 10 
                'B' -> 11 
                'C' -> 12 
                'D' -> 13 
                'E' -> 14 
                'F' -> 15
                'a' -> 10 
                'b' -> 11 
                'c' -> 12 
                'd' -> 13 
                'e' -> 14 
                'f' -> 15
                otherwise -> 0
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Neither of these functions is tail recursive - try writing them in prefix form and it will be obvious that they aren't. –  stephen tetley Feb 18 '13 at 17:52
    
@stephen ...thank you for pointing that out, I did not know the difference between tail and other recursion. –  user2073990 Feb 19 '13 at 1:58

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