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Below is the code that I am using.

I would like the output be 1.65, but I get 0.

This seems like a problem of scope. However I have declared the variable t as static, so why is the output still 0?

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public static double t;

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 100; i = i + 1)
            {
                t = (i * (1 / 60));
            }
            MessageBox.Show(Convert.ToString(t));
        }
    }
}
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3  
you reset the value of T on every iteration of the loop, so the entire loop is utterly pointless and boils down to t = (99 * 1/60) –  Marc B Feb 17 '13 at 21:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

1 / 60 will always be 0.

You are doing integer division.

In a division operation, you need at least one of the operands to be double if you want a double result.

Changing:

t = (i * (1 / 60));

To:

t = (i * (1 / 60D));

Or:

t = (i * (1D / 60));

Will solve the issue.

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1  
+1 for double constant instead of casting :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Feb 17 '13 at 22:01
    
@lazyberezovsky - A double literal ;) –  Oded Feb 17 '13 at 22:03
    
yep, looks like 2 a.m. is a time when literals look like constants :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Feb 17 '13 at 22:04

When you dividing integer values, you get an integer. 1 / 60 produce zero. Cast one of operands to double (double)1/60 to get correct double result. Or, when you are using constants like in this case, you can use double literals instead of integer literals.

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Why are you doing 100 divisions but only showing the messagebox once? It's the same as:

t = (99 * (1 / 60));
MessageBox.Show(Convert.ToString(t));
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That's not the "problem" here. Still It's right ;) –  Janes Abou Chleih Feb 17 '13 at 22:03
    
This is just a snippet of some debugging code that I am using in my projectile motion simulation program! :) –  user1920206 Feb 17 '13 at 22:04

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