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I have the following html:

<div class="main_container">
    <div class="sub_container">
        <div class="floating">wookie1</div>
        ...
        <div class="floating">wookie5</div>
    </div>
</div>

Consider it's like an image gallery.

main_container has an unfixed size, it's set as a percentage of the user resolution. I want sub_container to have the exact width of the sum of the floating div.

If I use "display:table;" for sub_container and "display: inline-block;" for floating divs, it works fine:

enter image description here

until I have enough div in the list, so that the sum of width is larger than main_container and they break on the next line:

enter image description here

But still, I want subcontainer (yellow background) to to be ALWAYS the EXACT WIDTH of the sum of the divs, even when they go on several lines, like this:

enter image description here

I've googled for hours now, and wasn't able to find an elegant solution (css only, if possible.)

Here's the jsfiddle, to play with this.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand the question. .main_container has a fixed width which is smaller than the sum of the small divs inside –  galchen Feb 18 '13 at 0:30
    
Maybe i was unclear. I want the sub_container to have ALWAYS the exact width of the sum of the floating div, even when the number of div breaks to another line –  Sebastien Feb 18 '13 at 0:31
    
but what if the inner floating divs' sum is larger than the .main_container? –  galchen Feb 18 '13 at 0:32
    
Then they'll break to another line. But the sub_container still doesn't need to be 100% width. –  Sebastien Feb 18 '13 at 0:35
    
If you set the width on the parent element the sub container occupies the entire parent width. It seems a bug to me. Can anyone explain if this is the intended behavior? And WHY is it so? –  rcdmk Feb 18 '13 at 0:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

Pure CSS Solution

The problem is that for the items to "know" to wrap to the next line, the container has to have "filled" its available horizontal space, which is your .main_container width. Yet you want the background to not go beyond what is needed for the actual elements themselves. So I've used the elements themselves to create the background with the help of cobbled together pseudo-elements.

Here's the fiddle (tested in IE9, Firefox 18, Chrome 24 on a Win 7 machine)

What I am doing is piecing together the background with each individual .floating element, which makes the right most element to be the right border control for the size of the background (note the two different width examples in the fiddle).

The explanation of each part is given in the comments below. There are a two key limitations to note:

  1. The .floating cannot have a position set, so that is a potential limitation based on particular application.
  2. The background needs to be either a solid color or purely vertical oriented "motion" (i.e. a gradient fading from top to bottom, or horizontal lines would work).

KEY CSS (with explanatory comments)

.sub_container {
    border-left: 1px solid #333; /* forms its own left border */
    overflow: hidden; /* needed for background and border to work */ 
    position: relative; /* positioning background off this */
    z-index: 1; /* needs a stacking context */
}

.floating {
    font-size:20px;
    line-height:30px;
    padding:0 5px 0 5px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    margin: 3px;
    display: inline-block;
    /* NOTE: CANNOT be given positioning  */
}

.floating:after {
    content: '';
    position: absolute; /* will position off subcontainer */
    border-top: 1px solid black; /* makes the top/bottom border itself */
    border-bottom: 1px solid black;
    z-index: -1; /* push it to the background */
    top: 0; /* set it to top of sub_subcontainer */
    bottom: 0; /* set it to bottom of sub_container */
    margin-left: -100%; /* shove it past the far left edge of sub_container */
    /* next, use padding to bring it back to its position at the end
       of the text string of .floating */
    padding-left: 100%;
    /* next, add enough padding on the right to compensate for the right
       padding, right margin, and right border of .floating */
    padding-right: 9px; 
    background-color: yellow; /* set your background color */
    /* NOTE: this will not work with a background image that
       has any horizonal differences to it (top to bottom 
       gradient would probably be okay) */
}

.floating:before { /* make right border */
    content: '';
    padding-top: 10000px; /* give it some obscene height that will not be exceeded */
    margin: -5000px 0; /* counter the padding height by half size margins top/bottom */
     /* next, push this behind the background with an even lower z-index
        to hide it if it is not the right most element beign used to 
        form the right border */
    z-index: -2;
    border-right: 1px solid black; /* make the right border */
    float: right; /* get the before element to the right */
    position: relative; /* needs to be adjusted in position */
    right: -9px; /* move it same as padding-right of the after element */
    display: block; /* give it a display */
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome !! I've forked the fiddle to make it closer to what i want: jsfiddle.net/3svfj/2. You're going for the validate and the bounty. Last question: can we make this work with an overflow: auto on the main_container ? I've failed so far. –  Sebastien Feb 21 '13 at 23:27
    
@Seb37: Just to make sure I'm clear, you elsewhere had said the main_container would be size by browser window (I believe). Are you wanting it to have a width of the window, but overflow-y on height? Or do you want overflow both directions (in which case I would have to say, when do you want the elements inside to wrap to a new line)? –  ScottS Feb 22 '13 at 0:12
    
Only overflow-y on height. Yes, i want main_container to be sized by browser window. –  Sebastien Feb 22 '13 at 1:06
    
@Seb37: You had a number of key things not set up in your fiddle to make it work. The background-color cannot be on the sub_container to get it to "fit" the width of the content. Also, I discovered the additional limitation that this does not allow text-align: center to be on the wrapper elements (but can be on the floating element itself). Here is the adjusted fiddle. However, if you wanted them to just align evenly and center, then you didn't really want what your question asked for and all my work was (nearly) in vain. –  ScottS Feb 22 '13 at 1:49
    
I don't want only to align sub_container in center. I need subcontainer to define a specific style (shadow-box, background, etc). I actually have a design in which the width of the page is split in 3 elements: left menu (fixed width), right menu (fixed width) and center that takes all the width left. I don't control main_container size, but i want to add a sub_container in it that will add some background and style to the gallery, so i really need sub_container div to be set the the exact width i want. I also need to be able to have overflow-y on the main container. Thx for your work. –  Sebastien Feb 22 '13 at 2:04

I got bored trying this and created a JS script based on jQuery to solve it.

var t = $(".sub_container").width()/$(".floating").outerWidth();
$(".sub_container").width(parseInt(t) * $(".floating").outerWidth());

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
I admit it does the trick, but i was looking for a pure html/css solution... –  Sebastien Feb 18 '13 at 1:27
    
Yeah!, good luck. You can fall back to this, if you can't find. :) –  Starx Feb 18 '13 at 1:30
    
@Seb37 Starx is right there is no solution for this problem using html/css. its better to follow the jquery code that will be better and fullyu browser compatible too. +! from my side. –  w3uiguru Feb 20 '13 at 15:47
    
Well, this is the workaround i'm currently using. If i don't get better answer by the end of the bounty, i'll validate this one. –  Sebastien Feb 20 '13 at 15:52

Reread your question...since you won't commit to anything (max-width:80%, 500px, etc) I broke everything on the 4th child - per your example.

CSS

.main_container, .sub_container, .floating { outline:1px solid black }
.sub_container { background-color:yellow; display:table; padding-left:5px }
.floating {
    float:left;
    padding:5px;
    margin:5px 5px 5px 0;
}
.floating:nth-child(4n+5) {
    clear:left;
    float:left;
}

HTML

<div class="main_container">
    <div class="sub_container">
        <div class="floating">wookie1</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie2</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie3</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie4</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie5</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie6</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie7</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie8</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie9</div>
    </div>
</div>

enter image description here

EDIT (option 2)
I don't believe what you're trying to do can be accomplished by HTML/CSS alone. I offer another solution based on a hunch...and your Image Gallery comment.

CSS

.main_container, .sub_container, .floating { outline:1px solid black }
.main_container {
    text-align:center
}
.sub_container { background-color:yellow; display:inline-block; max-width:80%; }
.floating {
    display:inline-block;
    padding:5px;
    margin:5px;
}

HTML

<div class="main_container">
    <div class="sub_container">
        <div class="floating">wookie1wookie1wookie1</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie2</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie3</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie4</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie5</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie6wookie6</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie7wookie7wookie7</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie8</div>
        <div class="floating">wookie9</div>
    </div>
</div>

It does not make .subcontainer snap to the contents; however, (using max-width) it does allow you to give it some breathing room from the main container and its children can be of various sizes.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually the most instructive answer i got. But unfortunately, it's still not enough: i don't control the size of the main_container, because it's set as a percentage of user resolution. Otherwise, i could have just adapted the width of maincontainer (with some LESS/SASS definition) to perfectly match 4 * floating div width. I'll still edit the question. –  Sebastien Feb 21 '13 at 2:23
    
Added another approach to your problem. It's not exactly what you're looking for, but I don't that it's even possible to do what you want w straight HTML/CSS. –  Dawson Feb 21 '13 at 15:17
    
display:table; that's the solution –  FARHAD AFSAR Dec 13 '14 at 11:03

Delete main container width and .sub_container position absolute and you should be good to go.

.main_container {
    #width:380px;
}

.sub_container {
    #position: absolute;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried on the jsfiddle, but it didn't work –  Sebastien Feb 18 '13 at 0:36
    
I still want main_container to have it's width, i just want sub_container to fit EXACTLY the width of the sum of div –  Sebastien Feb 18 '13 at 0:38
    
I see, try adding max-width: 335px; to the .main_container –  jakmarkiewicz Feb 18 '13 at 0:42
    
This is not where i want to go. I actually WANT thoses divs to go on several lines when they need to. What i want is sub_container to still fit the width of the divs. I edited the question, maybe it's more clear now. –  Sebastien Feb 18 '13 at 0:46
    
I see, I don't think this is possible in pure css. You might need to try it with jQuery like this: stackoverflow.com/questions/2335494/… –  jakmarkiewicz Feb 18 '13 at 0:57

Use span element instead of div for "sub_container"

.sub_container{background-color:yellow;}     
share|improve this answer
    
I tried here jsfiddle.net/T23cs but it doesn't work –  Sebastien Feb 21 '13 at 12:22

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