Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Why does a function declaration need to be wrapped in parentheses to be immediately invoked? I'm curious as to how the interpreter reads the immediately invoked function when wrapped in parentheses.

I.e.

Why must I do this...

(function() { 
   // Logic 
 })();

and not this...

function() { 
   // Logic 
 }();
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Explosion Pills, Felix Kling, VisioN, Fyodor Soikin, 0x499602D2 Feb 18 '13 at 0:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
The second is OK where an expression is allowed, e.g. var x = function(){return 'foo'}(); –  RobG Feb 18 '13 at 3:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When a function is wrapped in parenthesis it's parsed as an expression - a function expression. Otherwise without them it's parsed as a function declaration. A function declaration requires a name which it sees you have not given it, which in turn causes a syntax error. Moreover, you can't apply () inline to a function declaration in order to call it. The empty parenthesis is a syntax error, but a non-empty parenthesis is an expression which will be evaluated separately from the function.

share|improve this answer
2  
function foo(){}(bar); is valid though, but it does not do what one might intend. –  Felix Kling Feb 18 '13 at 0:43
    
Wonderful answer that makes total sense, thank you. –  contactmatt Feb 18 '13 at 17:39
    
@FelixKling, what would your example do? –  contactmatt Feb 18 '13 at 17:41
    
@contactmatt: It would define a function foo and then evaluate the expression inside the parenthesis. In (bar), the parenthesis are the grouping operator (as in (5 + 3) * 2), they are not calling parenthesis. –  Felix Kling Feb 18 '13 at 18:04

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.