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So, I understand that mixing javascript into HTML is bad, even in head. But lets see this code (I want to remove items the from list)

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.
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<div>item1 <a href="#" onclick="return deleteThisItemById (1);">delete me</a><br />
<div>item4 <a href="#" onclick="return deleteThisItemById (4);">delete me</a><br />
<div>item5 <a href="#" onclick="return deleteThisItemById (5);">delete me</a><br />
.
.
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This list is generated by PHP. deleteThisItemById() is in an external .js file. Is this still considered bad? If so, what would be a canonical solution? jQuery is acceptable, as is raw javascript.

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1  
I don't think there is anything wrong with what you have done there. Inline javascript is indeed a very very bad thing, but there is nothing wrong with require external javascript in head. One could make the case for adding a jquery click handler rather then doing it in an onclick, but even then, your javascript and/or jquery would STILL have to be imported somewhere wouldn't it? –  Abraham P Feb 18 '13 at 1:09
1  
Inline JS isn't "very very bad". It's restrictive in some scenarios, but the lines between content and presentation have been blurring for years. Use best practice when you can, and be happy with life when you can't. –  isherwood Feb 18 '13 at 1:13
    
If you want to learn about the various ways of binding event handlers, have a look at quirksmode.org/js/introevents.html. –  Felix Kling Feb 18 '13 at 1:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
$(function() {
  $('a#my_id1').click(function() {
    var myId = $(this).attr('id');
    return deleteThisItemByID(myId);
  });
});

<div>
    item1 
    <a id="my_id1" href="#">delete me</a>
</div>

By the way, your HTML is invalid. You have improperly nested div tags.

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1  
Syntax error in your $function() Missing a bracket :P. To be fair though, I left out the closing div tags when I copied from the OP. I changed after I read your post. –  Klik Feb 18 '13 at 1:12
    
Thanks. Syntax fixed. –  isherwood Feb 18 '13 at 1:14
    
that's ok, but how to pass a parameter to the .click() function? I meant how to know which item was clicked? –  John Smitth Feb 18 '13 at 1:15
    
Answer updated. –  isherwood Feb 18 '13 at 1:16

Simple... give the item you want removed a class or id (only use an id if its only one item)

<div>item1 <a href="#" class='deleteMe'>delete me</a><br /></div>
<div>item4 <a href="#" class='deleteMe'>delete me</a><br /></div>
<div>item5 <a href="#" class='deleteMe'>delete me</a><br /></div>

Then target the elements with jQuery

$('.deleteMe').on('click', function(event) {
    $(this).remove();
});

Note... if you wanted to remove the entire div, use this selector:

$('.deleteMe').closest('div').on('click', function(event) {
    $(this).remove();
});
share|improve this answer
    
actually it would be an ajax request, so removing the div itself wont be the solution :) –  John Smitth Feb 18 '13 at 1:46
    
If its an Ajax request or not does not make a difference. That would only change when the thread passes through the code (if you put it in the success function) or if you use a jQuery delayed object (a 'promise'). It really just depends on where the elements lie in your HTML document or where you have dynamically inserted them. If the HTML is what you gave me, then both of my solutions will work. –  Klik Feb 18 '13 at 2:28

you could use addEventListener to do this. Then no js-code will be in your html:

var elems = document.querySelectorAll("div.removable");
for(var i=0;i<elems.length;i++){      
    elems[i].querySelector("a").addEventListener("click",function(e){
        var toRemove = this.parentNode;
        var parent = toRemove.parentNode;
        parent.removeChild(toRemove);
    },false);
}

however, I iterate over the divs, so I added a class for this:

<div>
    <div  class="removable">item1 <a href="#">delete me</a></div><br />
    <div  class="removable">item2 <a href="#">delete me</a></div><br />
    <div  class="removable">item2 <a href="#">delete me</a></div><br />
</div>

Have a look at this fiddle

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I like to stash id's and similar metadata in "data-" attributes on the dom elements that represent those objects.

In this case I will usually use a similar setup

<ul class="posts">
  <li class="post" data-post="####">
    <p>content...</p>
    <ul class="actions">
      <li>
        <a class="delete">delete</a>
      </li>
    </ul>
  </li>
</ul>

Then in an .js file included at the bottom of the page:

$('.posts').on('click', '.actions .delete',
function() {
  // which post should be deleted?
  var $post = $(this).closest('.post');
  // remove the DOM element
  $post.remove();
  // some sort of ajax operation
  $.ajax({
    // url, dataType, etc
    data: { post_id: $post.data('id') }
  });
});

This one handler will apply to all ".action .delete" elements in the main list, meaning that if you want to add a loader or pagination that uses ajax to modify or add times to the list, the one event handler will still work wonderfully.

share|improve this answer
    
aha! But passing "stranger" attributes results in invalid HTML.... –  John Smitth Feb 18 '13 at 1:47
1  
data-xxx attributes are valid when using the HTML5 doctype –  Spencer Alger Feb 18 '13 at 1:55

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