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Take the following static method:

public static String fileToString(String filename) throws Exception {
        FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(filename);
        byte[] buffer = new byte[8192];
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();   
        int bytesRead; // unused? weird compiler messages...
        while((bytesRead = fis.read(buffer)) != -1) { // InputStream.read() returns -1 at EOF
            sb.append(new String(buffer));
        }
        return new String(sb);
    } 

As you can see everything looks okay, and it is perfect for small text files. But once you get to big files with thousands of lines, you encounter problems with repeating text. Based on my intuition, I thoughtbyte[] buffer was "unclean", so to speak. So I added the following line to the method:

buffer = new byte[8192];

So that it is now:

public static String fileToString(String filename) throws Exception {
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(filename);
    byte[] buffer = new byte[8192];
    StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();   
    int bytesRead; // unused? weird compiler messages...
    while((bytesRead = fis.read(buffer)) != -1) { // InputStream.read() returns -1 at EOF
        sb.append(new String(buffer));
        buffer = new byte[8192]; // added new line here
    }
    return new String(sb);
} 

And it's perfect, except for the fact that at the end of the String that the static method returns, I get a lot of null characters (depends on the buffer size). What's going on here?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

actually: // unused? weird compiler messages...

is not weird. You never read this.

how could sb.append(new String(buffer)); know how many bytes are written to the buffer.

Exactly, this is where bytesRead comes into play.

So you need new String(bytes, offset, length)

public static String fileToString(String filename) throws Exception {
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(filename);
    byte[] buffer = new byte[8192];
    StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();   
    int bytesRead; // unused? weird compiler messages...
    while((bytesRead = fis.read(buffer)) != -1) { // InputStream.read() returns -1 at EOF
        sb.append(new String(buffer,0,bytesRead));
        buffer = new byte[8192];
        bytesRead=0;
    }
    return new String(sb);
} 

might work

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Oh I did not realise that. I thought since we are assigning the variable bytesRead, then comparing them, we are reading bytesRead already. Also I don't think you need to reset bytesRead to 0. –  Soyuz Feb 18 '13 at 2:03
    
nope, we are checking the full expression (bytesRead = fis.read(buffer)) against -1 –  cIph3r Feb 18 '13 at 2:05
    
What's the difference? –  Soyuz Feb 18 '13 at 2:05
    
bytesRead is never read, only written –  cIph3r Feb 18 '13 at 2:06
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You really shouldnt be reading bytes and creating a String from the raw bytes. THis is wrong because it completely ignores the encoding of the text. You might be lucky and be reading ASCII in which case things will just work out. In all other cases this is asking for trouble.

You really should use a BufferedReader which wraps an InputStreamReader which wraps your source InputStream.

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It seems to work with non-English (non-ASCII) text -- Chinese, Arabic etc. I considered using *Reader but since you check every line, would that be considered bad for performance? –  Soyuz Feb 18 '13 at 2:07
    
maybe, because you read out of utf-8 textfiles. Therefore, the encoding and the byte-representation might be the same. Java uses UTF-16 as far as I know. If you read a non-utf textfile, you might encounter problems –  cIph3r Feb 18 '13 at 2:10
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Don't reinvent wheel. If you are not doing a school homework, use existing library like Apache commons IO. http://commons.apache.org/io/apidocs/org/apache/commons/io/IOUtils.html#toString%28java.io.InputStream,%20java.nio.charset.Charset%29

For example you can read the File into a String in just a few lines like following:

public static String fileToString(String filepath) throws Exception {
     return IOUtils.toString(new FileInputStream(filepath), "utf-8");
}

This will save you from lot of hand -written custom code and possibly have much lesser bugs.

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