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When an ActiveXObject is hosted in a Windows Desktop/Sidebar Gadget, that ActiveXObject is sort of cached and the DLL file for it is locked (meaning it cannot be moved, deleted or renamed). The problem is this; when the gadget is subsequently closed, the DLL is still locked by Windows Sidebar and it cannot be removed. This causes a significant problem whereby a new version of the gadget cannot be installed over the top of a previous version of the gadget, it fails during the process of deleting it without any error messages.

This isn't very user-friendly, so I'm looking for a way to "sever" ties to the ActiveX control somehow during the gadget's unload event. I'm hoping someone can tell me whether or not this is possible and if it is give me some ideas on how to implement it.

FYI, Windows Sidebar Gadgets are actually just Internet Explorer server windows, so it's probably safe to assume IE exhibits the same behavior.

EDIT: Unlocker seems to do pretty much what I need to do, so how can I achieve the same thing programmatically in .NET?

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I edited my answer, see option 4. This problem is now solved :D –  ParmesanCodice Oct 11 '09 at 18:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+75

Okay this is a rather complex problem. I have seen this behavior before, I'm not familiar with the Windows Desktop/Sidebar Gadget as I don't use it. However I've managed to come up with three possible methods of attack

1. Handle from TechNet

This wasn't my idea, there is another StackOverflow thread that recommends this method. However I'm skeptical as to whether or not this will work. There is a difference between a file lock (what this utility handles) and a "loaded library" lock which is what I assume is the problem you are having with ActiveX.

I modified the code from that thread slightly, there they use Process.Kill() to release the lock, I would think it's better to use handle.exe to release the lock.

public struct LockInfo
{
    public int PID;
    public string Handle;

    public LockInfo(int pid, string handle)
    {
        this.PID = pid;
        this.Handle = handle;
    }
}      

static List<LockInfo> getLockingInfo(string fileName)
{            
    List<LockInfo> lockingProcesses = new List<LockInfo>();

    Process tool = new Process();
    tool.StartInfo.FileName = "handle.exe";
    tool.StartInfo.Arguments = fileName;
    tool.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
    tool.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
    tool.Start();
    tool.WaitForExit();
    string outputTool = tool.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();

    // I;m not so hot with regex, so a bit of regex and a bit of manual splitting
    string matchPattern = @"(?<=\s+pid:\s+)\b(\d+)\b(\s+)\b(\S+:)";
    foreach (Match match in Regex.Matches(outputTool, matchPattern))
    {
        string[] temp = match.Value.Replace(":", "").Split(new char[] { ' ' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
        if (temp.Length == 2)
        {
            lockingProcesses.Add(new LockInfo(int.Parse(temp[0].Trim()), temp[1].Trim()));
        }
    }
    return lockingProcesses.Count > 0 ? lockingProcesses : null;
}

static bool closeFileHandle(List<LockInfo> lockingInfo)
{
    if ((lockingInfo == null) || (lockingInfo.Count == 0))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("lockingProcesses cannot be null or empty");
    }

    bool fileClosed = true;

    foreach (LockInfo lockInfo in lockingInfo)
    {
        Process tool = new Process();
        tool.StartInfo.FileName = "handle.exe";
        tool.StartInfo.Arguments = string.Format("-c {0} -y -p {1}", lockInfo.Handle, lockInfo.PID.ToString());
        tool.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
        tool.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        tool.Start();
        tool.WaitForExit();
        string outputTool = tool.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
        if (outputTool.IndexOf("Handle closed") == -1)
        {
            fileClosed = false;
        }
    }
    return fileClosed;
}

public static void Main()
{            
    //Path to locked file, make sure the full path is in quotes
    string fileName = "\"" + @"C:\Your_Path\To_The\ActiveX.ocx" + "\"";
    List<LockInfo> lockInfo = getLockingInfo(fileName);
    if ((lockInfo != null) && (lockInfo.Count > 0))
    {
        closeFileHandle(lockInfo);
    }                                 
}

...


2. Win32 Style

There isn't a lot of info on the internets about this, and it would seem there are some undocumented api calls that are needed to pull this off smoothly.

I these c++ examples might help.

Unfortunately I couldn't get this to work seamlessly. I have tested this method using an ActiveX loaded in MS Word. I then tried to unlock the ActiveX, it's not very stable and often caused word to crash. I guess I don't have the required c++ war wounds to decipher the above programs correctly.

Along with this example of CreateRemoteThread in C# I did put this code together.

public struct ProcessInfo
{
    public Process Process;
    public ProcessModule Module;

    public ProcessInfo(Process process, ProcessModule module)
    {
        this.Process = process;
        this.Module = module;
    }
}

private static List<ProcessInfo> getProcessInfo(string fileName, bool partialMatch)
{
    List<ProcessInfo> myProcesses = new List<ProcessInfo>();

    Process[] runningProcesses = Process.GetProcesses();
    int i = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < runningProcesses.Length; i++)
    {
        Process currentProcess = runningProcesses[i];
        try
        {
            if (!currentProcess.HasExited)
            {
                try
                {
                    ProcessModuleCollection modules = currentProcess.Modules;
                    int j = 0;
                    for (j = 0; j < modules.Count; j++)
                    {
                        if (partialMatch)
                        {
                            if ((modules[j].FileName.ToLower().IndexOf(fileName.ToLower()) != -1))
                            {
                                myProcesses.Add(new ProcessInfo(currentProcess, modules[j]));
                                break;
                            }
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            if ((modules[j].FileName.ToLower().CompareTo(fileName.ToLower()) == 0))
                            {
                                myProcesses.Add(new ProcessInfo(currentProcess, modules[j]));
                                break;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
                catch (NotSupportedException)
                {
                    // You are attempting to access the Modules property for a process that is running on a remote computer. 
                    // This property is available only for processes that are running on the local computer. 
                }
                catch (InvalidOperationException)
                {
                    // The process Id is not available.
                }
                catch (Win32Exception)
                {
                    // You are attempting to access the Modules property for either the system process or the idle process. 
                    // These processes do not have modules.
                }
            }
        }
        catch (InvalidOperationException)
        {
            // There is no process associated with the object. 
        }
        catch (Win32Exception)
        {
            // The exit code for the process could not be retrieved. 
        }
        catch (NotSupportedException)
        {
            // You are trying to access the HasExited property for a process that is running on a remote computer.
            // This property is available only for processes that are running on the local computer.

        }
    }
    return myProcesses.Count > 0 ? myProcesses : null;
}

private static void forceRemoteCloseHandle(ProcessInfo processInfo)
{
    // Open remote process for write
    IntPtr hProcess = NativeMethods.OpenProcess(NativeMethods.PROCESS_CREATE_THREAD | NativeMethods.PROCESS_VM_OPERATION |
            NativeMethods.PROCESS_VM_WRITE | NativeMethods.PROCESS_VM_READ, false, processInfo.Process.Id);

    // Get the handle to CloseHandle in kernel32.dll
    IntPtr hKernel32 = NativeMethods.LoadLibrary("kernel32.dll");
    IntPtr hCloseHandle = NativeMethods.GetProcAddress(hKernel32, "CloseHandle");
    uint temp = 0;

    // Create the remote thread and point it to CloseHandle
    IntPtr hCreateRemoteThread = NativeMethods.CreateRemoteThread((IntPtr)hProcess, (IntPtr)0, 0, hCloseHandle, (IntPtr)processInfo.Module.BaseAddress, 0, out temp);

    // Wait for thread to end
    NativeMethods.WaitForSingleObject(hCreateRemoteThread, 2000);

    //Closes the remote thread handle
    NativeMethods.CloseHandle(hCreateRemoteThread);

    //Free up the kernel32.dll
    if (hKernel32 != null)
        NativeMethods.FreeLibrary(hKernel32);

    //Close the process handle
    NativeMethods.CloseHandle(hProcess);
}

private static void forceRemoteFreeLibrary(ProcessInfo processInfo)
{
    // Open remote process for write
    IntPtr hProcess = NativeMethods.OpenProcess(NativeMethods.PROCESS_CREATE_THREAD | NativeMethods.PROCESS_VM_OPERATION |
            NativeMethods.PROCESS_VM_WRITE | NativeMethods.PROCESS_VM_READ, false, processInfo.Process.Id);

    // Get the handle to FreeLibrary in kernel32.dll
    IntPtr hKernel32 = NativeMethods.LoadLibrary("kernel32.dll");
    IntPtr hFreeHandle = NativeMethods.GetProcAddress(hKernel32, "FreeLibrary");

    // Create the remote thread and point it to FreeLibrary
    uint temp = 0;
    IntPtr hCreateRemoteThread = NativeMethods.CreateRemoteThread((IntPtr)hProcess, (IntPtr)0, 0, hFreeHandle, (IntPtr)processInfo.Module.BaseAddress, 0, out temp);

    // Wait for thread to end
    NativeMethods.WaitForSingleObject(hCreateRemoteThread, 2000);

    //Closes the remote thread handle
    NativeMethods.CloseHandle(hCreateRemoteThread);

    //Free up the kernel32.dll
    if (hKernel32 != null)
        NativeMethods.FreeLibrary(hKernel32);

    // Close the process handle
    NativeMethods.CloseHandle(hProcess);        
}

public static void Main()
{
    string strFile = @"C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\OFFICE11\MSCAL.OCX";
    List<ProcessInfo> lockingProcesses = getProcessInfo(strFile, false);

    foreach (ProcessInfo processInfo in lockingProcesses)
    {
        forceRemoteCloseHandle(processInfo);
        // OR
        forceRemoteFreeLibrary(processInfo);
    }

    // OR
    foreach (ProcessInfo procInfo in lockingProcesses)
    {
        procInfo.Process.Kill();
    }

}

internal static class NativeMethods
{
    internal const int PROCESS_TERMINATE = 0x0001;
    internal const int PROCESS_CREATE_THREAD = 0x0002;
    internal const int PROCESS_VM_OPERATION = 0x0008;
    internal const int PROCESS_VM_READ = 0x0010;
    internal const int PROCESS_VM_WRITE = 0x0020;

    internal const int PROCESS_QUERY_INFORMATION = 0x0400;

    [DllImport("Kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    internal static extern IntPtr OpenProcess(int dwDesiredAccess, bool bInheritHandle, int dwProcessId);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, ExactSpelling = true, SetLastError = true)]
    internal static extern IntPtr GetProcAddress(IntPtr hModule, string procName);

    [DllImport("Kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    internal static extern int WaitForSingleObject(IntPtr hHandle, int dwMilliseconds);

    [DllImport("kernel32", SetLastError = true)]
    internal static extern IntPtr LoadLibrary(string lpFileName);


    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    internal static extern bool FreeLibrary(IntPtr hModule);

    [DllImport("kernel32")]
    public static extern IntPtr CreateRemoteThread(IntPtr hProcess, IntPtr lpThreadAttributes, uint dwStackSize, IntPtr lpStartAddress, IntPtr lpParameter, uint dwCreationFlags, out uint lpThreadId);

    [DllImport("Kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    internal static extern int CloseHandle(IntPtr hPass);
}

...


3. Just use Unlocker

This is my best recommendation. Handle from technet can't handle loaded dll/ocx locks (under my tests). Win32 is messy and undocumented.

Unlocker provides command line access so you can call it in exactly the same way as handle.exe. Just wack a /? after unlocker.exe in a command prompt to see the switches.

There is also a portable version of Unlocker available so you can bundle it into your deployment without forcing the end users to install the app.

If all else fails you could contact the author of Unlocker, check out this from his readme.

Licensing

If you are interested in redistributing Unlocker, either in original or modified form, or wish to use Unlocker source code in a product, please send e-mail to ccollomb@yahoo.com with details.

...


4. Use Process Hacker Shared Libraries

I just discovered this brilliant tool: Process Hacker which is written in 100% C# code (although it does use a lot of WinAPI functions via P/Invoke under the hood).

The best thing about this:it's open source (LGPL'd) and provides two libraries that developers can reference in their solutions: ProcessHacker.Common ProcessHacker.Native.

I downloaded the source and just a word of warning it's a pretty big solution so may take a bit of time to figure out exactly what/how to use it.

It uses the undocumented API functions (ntdll.dl) I spoke about in option 2 and can do everything Unlocker can and a whole lot more.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the way to go (I'd go with #2 myself). You will also need to deal with DLL reference counts, which you can't get to directly thru the ProcessModule class. Check out this website along those lines securityxploded.com/dllrefcount.php –  ScottTx Oct 8 '09 at 3:12
1  
@Scott Nice link. I must admit I forgot about DLL reference counts when compiling this code. –  ParmesanCodice Oct 8 '09 at 7:18
    
A very detailed and well thought out answer. Sorry that I was 2 hours late in marking it so you didn't get the full bounty. –  Andy E Oct 9 '09 at 12:58
    
@Andy Thanks, this is a very annoying problem, and it seems you really need to dig deep to solve it "properly". No harm done. –  ParmesanCodice Oct 9 '09 at 21:31

Not sure if this works for ActiveX objects but it definitively does for .NET assemblies. I use it for UnitTesting where the DLLs have to be overwritten smoothly. The mechanism used is shadow copying.

Closing handles from outside an application seems not really a very safe option.

It is not the solution maybe an idea or direction...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will certainly look into it. –  Andy E Oct 9 '09 at 12:59

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