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For my homework assignment, I need to convert a hexadecimal string to a base-10 integer using a recursive function (with as many helper methods as necessary).

This is what I've got so far:

-- Question 1, part (c):
hexChar :: Char -> Integer
hexChar ch
    | ch == '0' = 0
    | ch == '1' = 1
    | ch == '2' = 2
    | ch == '3' = 3
    | ch == '4' = 4
    | ch == '5' = 5
    | ch == '6' = 6
    | ch == '7' = 7
    | ch == '8' = 8
    | ch == '9' = 9
    | ch == 'A' = 10
    | ch == 'B' = 11
    | ch == 'C' = 12
    | ch == 'D' = 13
    | ch == 'E' = 14
    | ch == 'F' = 15
    | otherwise     = 0

parseHex :: String -> Integer
parseHex hxStr 
    | length hxStr /= 0 = (hexChar(last(hxStr)))+(10*parseHex(init(hxStr)))
    | otherwise         = 0  

However, this does not produce the correct results. Does anyone know of the correct way to do this?

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Hint: Try your function with the input '10' and using the (wrong) result, try to figure out where your error is. –  us2012 Feb 18 '13 at 4:25
1  
I was off by one character. Multiplying it by 16 now and the function is 100% working :) –  Govind Parmar Feb 18 '13 at 4:35
    
btw, you don't need so many parentheses, this should work fine: | length hxStr /= 0 = hexChar (last hxStr) + 16*parseHex (init hxStr) –  גלעד ברקן Feb 18 '13 at 6:00
    
try using not (null hxStr) instead of length hxStr /= 0. This is better, since it just checks if there is any elements in hxStr. Haskell strings are implemented as linked lists, so length hxStr takes time proportional to the length of hxStr. In contrast not (null hxStr) takes constant time to compute. –  Boris Feb 18 '13 at 11:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are really close. your error is on this line:

    | length hxStr /= 0 = (hexChar(last(hxStr)))+(10*parseHex(init(hxStr)))

Think about why you are multiplying by 10. Remember ... Hexadecimal is base 16.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow! That was simple. Thanks so much :) –  Govind Parmar Feb 18 '13 at 4:34
    
Glad to help! Good luck. –  Stephen Feb 18 '13 at 16:30

Now that you got the right answer, you should consider the style. Using pattern matching, this looks clearer already:

parseHex :: String -> Integer
parseHex [] = 0
parseHex hxStr = (hexChar(last(hxStr)))+(16*parseHex(init(hxStr)))

And it's also more efficient, as you don't need to evalute length hxStr (which is O(N)) at each recursive call to decide which case applies. Total runtime goes from O(N**2) to O(N).

It looks even better when you drop some parentheses, as groovy suggested:

parseHex :: String -> Integer
parseHex [] = 0
parseHex hxStr = hexChar (last hxStr) + 16 * parseHex (init hxStr))

It's unfortunate that you can't pattern match on hStr right away because you need init and last instead of head and tail. But you can mitigate that using reverse and a helper:

parseHex :: String -> Integer
parseHex hxStr = go (reverse hxStr)
    where go []     = 0
          go (x:xs) = hexChar x + 16 * parseHex xs

That last one may be just a matter of taste though. hexChar also becomes shorter:

hexChar '0' = 0
hexChar '1' = 1
...                  -- other cases here
hexChar _ = 0        -- 'otherwise' case; maybe throw an error instead?
share|improve this answer

After the problem is solved, here a shorter way to write this:

import Data.List
import Data.Maybe

hexChar ch = fromMaybe (error $ "illegal char " ++ [ch]) $ 
    elemIndex ch "0123456789ABCDEF"

parseHex hex = foldl' f 0 hex where
    f n c = 16*n + hexChar c
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I mean, if you're going to allow library functions, why not go straight to readHex? –  Daniel Wagner Feb 18 '13 at 13:59
    
For learning purposes, of course. If imports are forbidden, you can write parseHex using foldl (with the well-known drawbacks), and keep the original hexChar implementation. –  Landei Feb 18 '13 at 15:02

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