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I have a function to slide a image,I divided it into 10 small div,each div has part of image,then I use this function :

  function change()
{
    $(document).ready(function(){
        for(var i=1,t=0,s="";i<=10;i++)
        {
        s= "#img2_" + i;
        setTimeout(function(){$(s).slideDown(2000)},t);
        t= t+300;
        }
    });
}

I have a problem that only div with i=10 is slideDown,I tried to change the max of i and only the div with that i is slideDown. So what is my problem :(

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Try var $s=$("#img2_"+i) and use $s.slideDown... to make a closure –  mplungjan Feb 18 '13 at 5:01

1 Answer 1

By the time your timeout is executed, "s" will be equal to the value assigned at the end of the loop. This is because the function passed to setTimeout doesn't have it's own reference to s, it is using the "global" reference. To fix this, create a closure around the call to setTimeout like this:

function change() {
  $(document).ready(function(){
    for(var i=1,t=0,s="";i<=10;i++) {
      s= "#img2_" + i;
      (function(img, delay){
        setTimeout(function(){$(img).slideDown(2000)}, delay);
      })(s, t);
      t= t+300;
    }
  });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Tks Spencer Leland. I tried to figure it out,and your help is about "self ivoking anonymous function",right ? :D But I still dont understand why the loop doesnt work right and I have to use that "self ....", cause I think that my loop created each i,with each i create a new variable s and then pass s to the setTimeout funtion. Then why did you say that "This is because the function passed to setTimeout doesn't have it's own reference to s, it is using the "global" reference". I dont get your saying above,pls help me out.Tks so much ! –  Duc Anh Feb 18 '13 at 9:48
    
Well, the only time a reference to a variable is created is when you use the "var" keyword, as in: var s = "#img2_" + 1; Without the creating a local reference you will be using the global reference to s. Therefore in your original code, all of the s variables are technically the same, so when you change it, it is changed everywhere, including inside the function sent to setTimeout. –  Spencer Alger Feb 18 '13 at 15:03

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