Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So supposedly starting at Firefox > 4, binding the window jQuery object to beforeunload doesn't work anymore.

What'd I'd like to do is submit an AJAX post to delete my server's memcache data.

When I refresh the only open tab, I can see that the beforeunload event is called in both firefox and chrome with the following code as evidenced by the console.log message, "firefox/NON-firefox delete". The problem is that I never see the console.log message "memcache delete" indicating that my server never saw the $.ajax request.

I realize it is bad to do browser sniffing and that there is no difference between what's included in the if and else statements. I'm merely showing code for what I've tried unsuccessfully in Firefox.

Anyone have any ideas?

$(window).bind('beforeunload', function(){ 
  if(/Firefox[\/\s](\d+)/.test(navigator.userAgent) && new Number(RegExp.$1) >= 4) {
    console.log('firefox delete');
     memcacheDelete();
     return null;
  } 
  else {
    console.log('NON-firefox delete');
    memcacheDelete();
    return null;
  }
});

function memcacheDelete() {
   $.ajax({
      url: "/memcache/delete", 
      type: "post",
      data:{}, 
      success:function(){
          console.log('memcache deleted');
      }//success
  }); //ajax
}
share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Ajax is asynchronous.

When you refresh (or close)your browser, beforeunload is being called. And it means as soon as beforeunload is finished executing, page will refresh (or close).

When you do an ajax request, (since its asynchronous) javascript interpreter does not wait for ajax success event to be executed and moves down finishing the execution of beforeunload.

success of ajax is supposed to be called after few secs, but you dont see it as page has been refreshed / closed.

Side note:

.success() method is deprecated and is replaced by the .done() method

Reference

share|improve this answer
    
yes...the way i understand asynch calls this is what i thought...+1 – cliffbarnes Feb 18 '13 at 5:27
1  
@Jashwant, thanks for the explanation.Though, I have evidence that the memcache delete succeeded when using Chrome after closing/re-opening the browser, but it is still not deleting with firefox. There seems to be something else going on here..would converting the $.ajax to synchronous, async:false, help? – tim peterson Feb 18 '13 at 5:33
4  
It looks like changing the $.ajax option async to false corrects the problem. Is there any reason one wouldn't want to do that? – tim peterson Feb 18 '13 at 5:41
    
Usually ajax is true, as we dont want to wait until ajax completion. If you'll set async to false , your javascript code after ajax call wont execute until server's response. In your case specifically, I think refreshing / closing may take few seconds (until ajax is complete) – Jashwant Feb 18 '13 at 5:45
1  
Yes. all options for developer's sake . Use the one that suits you :) – Jashwant Feb 18 '13 at 5:51

Just for sake of completion, here's what I did, thanks to @Jashwant for the guidance: I noticed that this other SO Q&A suggested the same solution. The KEY is the async:true(false) in the $.ajax call below:

$(window).bind('beforeunload', function(){ 
  if(/Firefox[\/\s](\d+)/.test(navigator.userAgent) && new Number(RegExp.$1) >= 4) {
    console.log('firefox delete');
     var data={async:false};
     memcacheDelete(data);
     return null;
  } 
  else {
    console.log('NON-firefox delete');
     var data={async:true};
     memcacheDelete(data);
    return null;
  }
});

function memcacheDelete(data) {
  $.ajax({
    url: "/memcache/delete", 
    type: "post",
    data:{}, 
    async:data.async,
    success:function(){
      console.log('memcache deleted');
    }//success
  }); //ajax
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Just to feed my curiosity. What is the meaning (use) of && new Number(RegExp.$1) >= 4 in your Firefox-detecting routine (if)? Just assuring, that Firefox is in version 4 or newer? – trejder Jul 2 '13 at 11:24
    
yes I'd assume so – tim peterson Jul 2 '13 at 12:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.