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NoSQL DEFINITION: Next Generation Databases mostly addressing some of the points: being non-relational, distributed, open-source and horizontally scalable.

Is horizontally scalable the same thing(or include) distributed? If not, what it means?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

NoSQL systems employ a distributed architecture, with the data held in a redundant manner on several servers. In this way, the system can easily scale out by adding more servers, and failure of a server can be tolerated.

Horizontal scalability is the ability to increase the speed or availability of the server by adding more servers, typically using clustering and load balancing.

So yes both are similar terms. horizontal scalability increases the distributed architecture.

data replication if the same data is stored on multiple storage devices

SCHEMA FREE: In Oracle you would define your table structure first and then insert/delete your data but thats not the case with Schema free.No schema migrations. your code defines your schema. So no more Alter table statements.

Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NoSQL

http://searchcio.techtarget.com/definition/horizontal-scalability

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What's the difference? (please, in simple terms) –  IRus Feb 18 '13 at 6:39
    
What's the difference between distributed, horizontally scalable and easy replication support? nosql-database.org –  IRus Feb 18 '13 at 6:45
    
i hope this helps. –  gabhi Feb 18 '13 at 6:56
    
thank you for accepting my answer. I know these terms are bit confusing at first. From architecture point of view distributed , horizontal scalability, data replication are important whereas from developer's point of view Schema free is important term. –  gabhi Feb 18 '13 at 7:01

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