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if I allocate some memory using malloc() is there a way to mark it readonly. So memcpy() fails if someone attempt to write to it?

This is connected to a faulty api design where users are miss-using a const pointer returned by a method GetValue() which is part of large memory structure. Since we want to avoid copying of large chunk of memory we return live pointer within a structured memory which is of a specific format. Now problem is that some user find hack to get there stuff working by writing to this memory directly and avoid SetValue() call that does allocation and properly handing in memory binary format that we have developed. Although there hack sometime work but sometime it causes memory access violation due to incorrect interpretation of control flags which has been overridden by user.

Educating user is one task but let say for now we want there code to fail.

I am just wondering if we can simply protect against this case.

For analogy assume someone get a blob column from sqlite statement and then write back to it. Although in case of sqlite it will not make sense but this somewhat happing in our case.

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Not sure if the Q is OS specific, however in Windows you can do it via VirtualProtect + PAGE_READONLY. –  Roman R. Feb 18 '13 at 7:43
    
Our code is cross platform currently running on iOS, Andriod, WinRT and Window desktop. –  affan Feb 18 '13 at 7:46
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oh my god, it's a pagefault! everyone take cover! O_o –  Andreas Grapentin Feb 18 '13 at 8:47
    
no its not my mistake. Its cause variety of errors. Once they override any control flag a variety of error occur depending on scenario. Sometime offset calculation are wrong and program attempt to read wrong address or attempt free wrong buffer or realloc. –  affan Feb 18 '13 at 10:20
    
You may not copy the whole parent structure, but copy the requested Value (ie, return by value !). Also, you can check invariants (including checksums) whenever possible, and yell if your memory has been corrupted. Last idea, return indices to π digits range representing your value. They won't change π, will they ? –  John Optional Smith Feb 19 '13 at 20:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 54 down vote accepted

On most hardware architectures you can only change protection attributes on entire memory pages; you can't mark a fragment of a page read-only.

The relevant APIs are:

You'll need to ensure that the memory page doesn't contain anything that you don't want to make read-only. To do this, you'll either have to overallocate with malloc(), or use a different allocation API, such as mmap(), posix_memalign() or VirtualAlloc().

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Not just Linux, but on all POSIX operating systems that provide the memory protection extensions: pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009604499/functions/mprotect.html –  Raedwald Feb 19 '13 at 12:49

Depends on the platform. On Linux, you could use mprotect() (http://linux.die.net/man/2/mprotect).

On Windows you might try VirtualProtect() (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa366898(v=vs.85).aspx). I've never used it though.

Edit: This is not a duplicate of NPE's answer. NPE originally had a different answer; it was edited later and mprotect() and VirtualProtect() were added.

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+1 fpr that edit info :-) –  Ansh Feb 18 '13 at 9:00

a faulty api design where users are miss-using a const pointer returned by a method GetValue() which is part of large memory structure. Since we want to avoid copying of large chunk of memory we return live pointer within a structured memory which is of a specific format

That is not clearly a faulty API design. An API is a contract: you promise your class will behave in a particular way, clients of the class promise to use the API in the proper manner. Dirty tricks like const_cast are improper (and in some, but not all cases, have undefined behaviour).

It would be faulty API design if using const_cast lead to a security issue. In that case you must copy the chunk of memory, or redesign the API. This is the norm in Java, which does not have the equivalent of const (despite const being a reserved word in Java).

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