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In Python, how can I get all combinations of n binary values 0 and 1?

For example, if n = 3, I want to have

[ [0,0,0], [0,0,1], [0,1,0], [0,1,1], ... [1,1,1] ]  #total 2^3 combinations

How can I do this?

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marked as duplicate by eumiro, Donal Fellows, Nifle, SztupY, PaRiMaL RaJ Feb 18 '13 at 10:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@eumiro, I think my question is also equivalent to this one, stackoverflow.com/questions/3252528/… , but that answer gives a string instead of a list. –  LWZ Feb 18 '13 at 8:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use itertools.product

import itertools
lst = list(itertools.product([0, 1], repeat=3))

This will yield a list of tuples (see here)

You can easily change this to use a variable repeat:

n = 3
lst = list(itertools.product([0, 1], repeat=n))

If you need a list of lists, then you can use the map function (thanks @Aesthete).

lst = map(list, itertools.product([0, 1], repeat=n))

Or in Python 3:

lst = list(map(list, itertools.product([0, 1], repeat=n)))
# OR
lst = [list(i) for i in itertools.product([0, 1], repeat=n)]

Note that using map or a list comprehension means you don't need to convert the product into a list, as it will iterate through the itertools.product object and produce a list.

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3  
+1 - map(list, product([0, 1], repeat=3)) will return the same format in case the OP is interested. –  Aesthete Feb 18 '13 at 8:12
    
This is great, tuple is ok too. –  LWZ Feb 18 '13 at 8:14
    
@Volatility, just of curiosity, how do you know this? I had no clue how to find this function from the Python documentation. –  LWZ Feb 18 '13 at 8:18
1  
@LWZ It comes with experience. (see point 6) –  Volatility Feb 18 '13 at 8:20
    
@Volatility, what a great post, thanks! –  LWZ Feb 18 '13 at 8:23

Without using any in-build functions or smart techniques we can get like this

def per(n):
    for i in range(1<<n):
        s=bin(i)[2:]
        s='0'*(n-len(s))+s
        print map(int,list(s))
per(3)

output

[0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 1]
[0, 1, 0]
[0, 1, 1]
[1, 0, 0]
[1, 0, 1]
[1, 1, 0]
[1, 1, 1]
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Following will give you all such combinations

bin = [0,1]
[ (x,y,z) for x in bin for y in bin for z in bin ]
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He gives n=3 as an example only, so he wants to have this parametrized. –  eumiro Feb 18 '13 at 8:07
    
This works but n can't be large... –  LWZ Feb 18 '13 at 8:07

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