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Look at this simple logging class (only relevant parts here):

class Logger {
public:
    void log(string& msg){
        //lock for all instances
        cout << "[" << tag << "] " << msg;
        //unlock
    }
private:
     string tag;

};

What is the easiest way to synchronize the entire class (not instances) so that separate instances of Logger (in different threads) write to cout sequentially (not all at once) ?

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2  
static/global mutex? –  niXman Feb 18 '13 at 8:21
2  
Adding a static member of mutex type should do. –  Angew Feb 18 '13 at 8:22
    
Make yourself a synchronized std::cout. –  Xeo Feb 18 '13 at 8:22
    
@Xeo what do you mean? –  Queequeg Feb 18 '13 at 8:29
    
Watch this, there's an example for a synchronized std::cout (towards the middle and the end, IIRC). –  Xeo Feb 18 '13 at 8:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The usual way, with a mutex:

#include <mutex>

class Logger {
public:
    void log(string& msg)
    {
        // Lock for all instances
        std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(coutMutex);

        cout << "[" << tag << "] " << msg;

        // Unlocking happens automatically since the lock
        // gets destroyed here.
    }

private:
    string tag;
    static std::mutex coutMutex; // Don't forget to define this somewhere.
};
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this is nice. But does cout guarantee, that things pushed to it via << will be printed/flushed in order in a multi-threaded app? –  Queequeg Feb 18 '13 at 12:38
    
@Queequeg In C++03, iostream is not thread-safe (it might be, but the standard doesn't specify it.) In C++11, it is (the standard guarantees that there are no race conditions that would result in stream corruption.) However, the order of output is not guaranteed, unless you specifically synchronize it. So the short answer is: yes. If you synchronize, then cout << "12" in one thread and cout << "34" in another will never result in something like 1324 being printed. –  Nikos C. Feb 18 '13 at 17:34

The easiest way to do it:

class Logger {
public:
   void log(std::string& msg){
   //lock for all instances
   {  std::unique_lock<std::mutex> locker(_mut); // or std::lock_guard<std::mutex> locker(_mut);
      std::cout << "[" << tag << "] " << msg;
   } //unlock
private:
   std::string tag;
   static std::mutex _mut;
};
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Short version: Write a synchronized wrapper, wrap std::cout, then use the synchronized cout to write.

Long version:

#include <mutex>

template<typename T>
struct Synchronized {
  explicit Synchronized(T& t_):t(t_) {}

  template<typename Functor>
  auto operator()( Functor&& f ) const->decltype(f(t)) {
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> guard(myMutex);
    return f(t);
  }
// I could implement these, but I'm lazy:
  Synchronized& operator=(Synchronized const&) = delete;
  Synchronized& operator=(Synchronized &&) = delete;
  Synchronized(Synchronized const&) = delete;
  Synchronized(Synchronized &&) = delete;
private:
  mutable T& t;
  mutable std::mutex myMutex;
};


// in "sync_cout.h"
extern Synchronized<std::ostream> sync_cout;

// in "sync_cout.cpp"
Synchronized<std::ostream> sync_cout(std::cout);

// In "logger.h"

// #include "sync_cout.h"
class Logger {
public:
  void log(string& msg){
    sync_cout( [&](std::ostream& os) {
      os << "[" << tag << "] " << msg;
    });
  }
private:
   string tag;

};

(Stolen from Herb. Any errors in the above are my own, not Herb's.)

For superior performance, the above link also includes a non-blocking asynchronous wrapper.

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//use c++ 11 mutex

class CircularQueue
{
protected:
    int * data;
    int head;
    int tail;
    int size;
    std::mutex queueMutex;
public:
    CircularQueue(void);
    int dequeue();
    void enqueue(int x);
    void initialize(int size);
    virtual ~CircularQueue(void);
};



CircularQueue::CircularQueue(void)
{
    data = 0x0;
    head = -1;
    tail = -1;
    size=0;
}

int CircularQueue::dequeue()
{
    if(tail == head)
    {
        throw "empty queue!";
    }
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(queueMutex);

    int result = data[head];
    head ++;
    if(head >= size) 
    {
        head =head % size;
    }

    return result;
}


void CircularQueue::enqueue(int x)
{

    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(queueMutex);
    data[tail] = x;
    tail ++;
    if(tail >= size)
    {
        tail = tail % size;
    }
    if(tail == head)
    {
        throw "overflow!";
    }
}

void CircularQueue::initialize(int size)
{
    data = new int[size]; 
    head = 0;
    tail = 0;
    this->size = size;
}

CircularQueue::~CircularQueue(void)
{
    delete [] data;
}
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