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I'm not really writing an alarm clock application, but it will help to illustrate my question.

Let's say that I have a method in my application, and I want this method to be called every hour on the hour (e.g. at 7:00 PM, 8:00 PM, 9:00 PM etc.). I could create a Timer and set its Interval to 3600000, but eventually this would drift out of sync with the system clock. Or I could use a while() loop with Thread.Sleep(n) to periodically check the system time and call the method when the desired time is reached, but I don't like this either (Thread.Sleep(n) is a big code smell for me).

What I'm looking for is some method in .Net that lets me pass in a future DateTime object and a method delegate or event handler, but I haven't been able to find any such thing. I suspect there's a method in the Win32 API that does this, but I haven't been able to find that, either.

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4  
Are you looking to roll your own Quartz.Net? quartznet.sourceforge.net –  Austin Salonen Sep 29 '09 at 15:32
1  
@Austin: no, I'm just looking for a simple method like what I describe in the last paragraph, without having to roll my own or use some third-party component. –  MusiGenesis Sep 29 '09 at 15:46
1  
The built in Windows Scheduler has an API accessible via PInvoke pinvoke.net/default.aspx/netapi32/NetScheduleJobAdd.html –  xcud Sep 29 '09 at 15:56
    
@xcud: NetScheduleJobAdd is close to what I'm looking for, but it executes a command string rather than calling a method. –  MusiGenesis Sep 29 '09 at 20:35
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6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Or, you could create a timer with an interval of 1 second and check the current time every second until the event time is reached, if so, you raise your event.

You can make a simple wrapper for that :

public class AlarmClock
{
    public AlarmClock(DateTime alarmTime)
    {
        this.alarmTime = alarmTime;

        timer = new Timer();
        timer.Elapsed += timer_Elapsed;
        timer.Interval = 1000;
        timer.Start();

        enabled = true;
    }

    void  timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        if(enabled && DateTime.Now > alarmTime)
        {
            enabled = false;
            OnAlarm();
            timer.Stop();
        }
    }

    protected virtual void OnAlarm()
    {
        if(alarmEvent != null)
            alarmEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }


    public event EventHandler Alarm
    {
        add { alarmEvent += value; }
        remove { alarmEvent -= value; }
    }

    private EventHandler alarmEvent;
    private Timer timer;
    private DateTime alarmTime;
    private bool enabled;
}

Usage:

AlarmClock clock = new AlarmClock(someFutureTime);
clock.Alarm += (sender, e) => MessageBox.Show("Wake up!");

Please note the code above is very sketchy and not thread safe.

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Yeah, but that's also not what I'm looking for, sorry. –  MusiGenesis Sep 29 '09 at 15:19
4  
What you are looking for does not exist. –  RichardOD Sep 29 '09 at 15:28
1  
Sorry but, what are you looking for then? –  Coincoin Sep 29 '09 at 15:28
1  
I think MusiGenesis really wants a job scheduler. –  RichardOD Sep 29 '09 at 15:30
3  
You could calculate the interval rather than check every second. –  user159335 Sep 29 '09 at 15:34
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Interesting, I've actually come across a very similar issue and went looking for a method in the .Net framework that would handle this scenario. In the end, we ended up implementing our own solution that was a variation on a while loop w/ Thread.Sleep(n) where n gets smaller the closer you get to the desired target time (logarithmically actually, but with some reasonable thresholds so you're not maxing the cpu when you get close to the target time.) Here's a really simple implementation that just sleeps half the time between now and the target time.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SleepToTarget Temp = new SleepToTarget(DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(30),Done);
        Temp.Start();
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void Done()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Done");
    }
}

class SleepToTarget
{
    private DateTime TargetTime;
    private Action MyAction;
    private const int MinSleepMilliseconds = 250;

    public SleepToTarget(DateTime TargetTime,Action MyAction)
    {
        this.TargetTime = TargetTime;
        this.MyAction = MyAction;
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        new Thread(new ThreadStart(ProcessTimer)).Start();
    }

    private void ProcessTimer()
    {
        DateTime Now = DateTime.Now;

        while (Now < TargetTime)
        {
            int SleepMilliseconds = (int) Math.Round((TargetTime - Now).TotalMilliseconds / 2);
            Console.WriteLine(SleepMilliseconds);
            Thread.Sleep(SleepMilliseconds > MinSleepMilliseconds ? SleepMilliseconds : MinSleepMilliseconds);
            Now = DateTime.Now;
        }

        MyAction();
    }
}
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You could simply reset the timer duration each time it fires, like this:

// using System.Timers;

private void myMethod()
{
    var timer = new Timer { 
        AutoReset = false, Interval = getMillisecondsToNextAlarm() };
    timer.Elapsed += (src, args) =>
    {
        // Do timer handling here.

        timer.Interval = getMillisecondsToNextAlarm();
        timer.Start();
    };
    timer.Start();
}

private double getMillisecondsToNextAlarm()
{
    // This is an example of making the alarm go off at every "o'clock"
    var now = DateTime.Now;
    var inOneHour = now.AddHours(1.0);
    var roundedNextHour = new DateTime(
        inOneHour.Year, inOneHour.Month, inOneHour.Day, inOneHour.Hour, 0, 0);
    return (roundedNextHour - now).TotalMilliseconds;
}
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This wouldn't solve the problem, unfortunately. The drift problem is because the Timer is inaccurate over long durations (Stopwatch has the same problem). –  MusiGenesis Sep 29 '09 at 20:29
    
I'd never heard that before. What are you basing that inaccuracy claim on? –  Jacob Sep 29 '09 at 22:04
    
@Jacob: don't take my word for it - try it yourself. Start a timer (any variety) and let it run for a day or two, and see how far off it gets. –  MusiGenesis Oct 1 '09 at 14:34
    
I don't get this "drift" problem. I used a System.Timers.Timer with an elapsed time of five seconds within a service and did not have any drift over the four months I used it. I know this for a fact becasue the service wrote to the event log on every interval, and I have events every five seconds like clockwork, which was expected. –  AMissico Oct 1 '09 at 17:20
    
@AMissico: Did your service only start the Timer once and then write to the event log on each Elapsed call, or was your service periodically re-started by Windows? I just tested this again, and my Timer (with an Interval of 5000) drifted off from the system time by a full second after only 12 minutes. –  MusiGenesis Oct 10 '09 at 20:06
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You could create an Alarm class which has a dedicated thread which goes to sleep until the specified time, but this will use the Thread.Sleep method. Something like:

/// <summary>
/// Alarm Class
/// </summary>
public class Alarm
{
    private TimeSpan wakeupTime;

    public Alarm(TimeSpan WakeUpTime)
    {
        this.wakeupTime = WakeUpTime;
        System.Threading.Thread t = new System.Threading.Thread(TimerThread) { IsBackground = true, Name = "Alarm" };
        t.Start();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Alarm Event
    /// </summary>
    public event EventHandler AlarmEvent = delegate { };

    private void TimerThread()
    {
        DateTime nextWakeUp = DateTime.Today + wakeupTime;
        if (nextWakeUp < DateTime.Now) nextWakeUp = nextWakeUp.AddDays(1.0);

        while (true)
        {
            TimeSpan ts = nextWakeUp.Subtract(DateTime.Now);

            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep((int)ts.TotalMilliseconds);

            try { AlarmEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty); }
            catch { }

            nextWakeUp = nextWakeUp.AddDays(1.0);
        }
    }
}
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Ooh, Thread.Sleep(n) and an empty catch{} block. :P –  MusiGenesis Sep 29 '09 at 20:26
1  
Indeed. More a prototype of what you could do. Better to use a Timer like Jacob describes. –  JDunkerley Sep 29 '09 at 21:44
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I have used this before with great success:

Vb.net:

Imports System.Threading
Public Class AlarmClock
    Public startTime As Integer = TimeOfDay.Hour
    Public interval As Integer = 1
    Public Event SoundAlarm()
    Public Sub CheckTime()
        While TimeOfDay.Hour < startTime + interval
            Application.DoEvents()
        End While
        RaiseEvent SoundAlarm()
    End Sub
    Public Sub StartClock()
        Dim clockthread As Thread = New Thread(AddressOf CheckTime)
        clockthread.Start()
    End Sub
End Class

C#:

using System.Threading;
public class AlarmClock
{
    public int startTime = TimeOfDay.Hour;
    public int interval = 1;
    public event SoundAlarmEventHandler SoundAlarm;
    public delegate void SoundAlarmEventHandler();
    public void CheckTime()
    {
        while (TimeOfDay.Hour < startTime + interval) {
            Application.DoEvents();
        }
        if (SoundAlarm != null) {
            SoundAlarm();
        }
    }
    public void StartClock()
    {
        Thread clockthread = new Thread(CheckTime);
        clockthread.Start();
    }
}

I don't know if the c# works, but the vb works just fine.

Usage in VB:

Dim clock As New AlarmClock
clock.interval = 1 'Interval is in hours, could easily convert to anything else
clock.StartClock()

Then, just add an event handler for the SoundAlarm event.

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TimeOfDay is a VB.Net-only thing, and the While loop with a DoEvents() call will max out your processor while this thing is running. –  MusiGenesis Oct 10 '09 at 19:26
    
Didn't know that, but now I do. The original code had the loop sleep for 15 seconds, but since you didn't want that I left it out. –  Cyclone Oct 10 '09 at 19:48
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What about System.Timers.Timer class ? See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.timers.timer.aspx

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No, that doesn't do anything like what I'm looking for. –  MusiGenesis Sep 29 '09 at 15:47
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