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I have a table in the following format:

row_key  extID  tag   val
-------  -----  ---   ---
1         1     A     a
2         1     A     b
3         1     B     c
4         2     A     d
5         2     C     e

Now I want to have all extID's where there are several pairs of (tag, val) with specific values, for example:

(tag, val) = (A,a) AND (tag, val) = (B,c)

or,

(tag, val) = (C,e)

The number of constrains can change.

I can think of several ways to do this:

  1. Perform a self-join for each constraint
  2. Do the searching (iteratively) in the caller program (multiple SQL queries)
  3. (Maybe?) write a SQL function to do this
  4. Nested SELECT clauses (passing to the outer level the "extID" and using WHERE extID IN (SELECT extID FROM ...)
  5. The only true solution that I just can't find.

Which one would be the preferred (fastest and most elegant) way to do this? (Except, of course, "Surely, 5. is the correct answer.")

I think a multiple SELF-join is quite elegant. However, I do not know if it is fast and comparatively memory-efficient.

Further, I would like to use a way that works with MySQL, PostgreSQL and SQLite without adaptation - That's why I can't use PIVOT afaiu.

share|improve this question
    
What's the problem with your sample (tag, val) = (A,a) AND (tag, val) = (B,c)? –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 18 '13 at 8:50
    
@DanielHilgarth it will return no result because each row, there will only be one value of tag. –  John Woo Feb 18 '13 at 8:52
    
@JW.: Well, obviously you need to fix the AND. I meant the tuple syntax. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 18 '13 at 8:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT  extID
FROM    tableName
WHERE   (tag = 'A' AND val = 'a') OR
        (tag = 'B' AND val = 'c')
GROUP   BY extID
HAVING  COUNT(*) = 2

UPDATE 1

since you haven't mentioned that there can be duplicate combination of tag and val, DISTINCT keyword is needed.

SELECT  extID
FROM    tableName
WHERE   (tag = 'A' AND val = 'a') OR
        (tag = 'B' AND val = 'c')
GROUP   BY extID
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT tag, val) = 2
share|improve this answer
1  
@Dukeling it's for another condition. –  John Woo Feb 18 '13 at 8:53
    
@JW @Dukeling I understand it differently. I think he's looking for extID values for which there are both the combinations (A,a) and (B,c) –  w0lf Feb 18 '13 at 8:55
    
@JW I thought about this one, too. The problem is when there are two identical rows (except for row_id, of course), this would fail, because the count would give the wrong result... –  user2055010 Feb 18 '13 at 8:56
    
@w0lf and that's my answer is all about. BOTH Combination –  John Woo Feb 18 '13 at 8:56
1  
Thanks! the COUNT(DISTINCT tag,val) is the key (same in the version below) –  user2055010 Feb 18 '13 at 9:14

The tuple syntax would work:

SELECT  extID
FROM    tableName
WHERE   (tag, val) in (('A', 'a'), ('B', 'c'))
GROUP   BY extID
HAVING  COUNT(DISTINCT tag, val) = 2

The HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT tag, val) = 2 ensures that each constraint tuple was present at least once. This means that the 2 needs to be adjusted to the number of constraint tuples in the query.

This would even work if you have two identical rows like this and the condition is ('C', 'e'):

row_key  extID  tag   val
-------  -----  ---   ---
5         2     C     e
6         2     C     e

The query for this would look like this:

SELECT  extID
FROM    tableName
WHERE   (tag, val) in (('C', 'e'))
GROUP   BY extID
HAVING  COUNT(DISTINCT tag, val) = 1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I thinks its pretty similar to the answer from JW - the key is IMHO the COUNT(DISTINCT tag,val). –  user2055010 Feb 18 '13 at 9:13
    
@user2055010: Indeed. I posted my answer because I find the tuple syntax much neater and found the answer by JW a little bit lacking in terms of explanations. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 18 '13 at 9:16

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