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Suppose I have a class called Animal and a subclass called Dog. How can I access the Animal's unicode definition from the Dog class?

 class Animal:
      def __unicode__(self):
           return 'animal'

 class Dog(Animal):
      def __unicode__(self):
           return 'this %s is a dog' % (I want to get the Animal's __unicode__ here)
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Is this Python 2 or Python 3? (Your code is missing some def keywords, by the way.) –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 18 '13 at 9:56
    
It's python 2. And yeah, sorry about the def. –  Lim H. Feb 18 '13 at 9:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since you're implementing old-style classes in Python 2, you can only access the methods of your base class by their qualified names:

class Animal:
    def __unicode__(self):
        return 'animal'

class Dog(Animal):
    def __unicode__(self):
        return 'this %s is a dog' % Animal.__unicode__(self)

However, if you modify your base class so it becomes a new-style class, then you can use super():

class Animal(object):
    def __unicode__(self):
        return 'animal'

class Dog(Animal):
    def __unicode__(self):
        return 'this %s is a dog' % super(Dog, self).__unicode__()

Note that all classes are new-style classes in Python 3, so super() can always be used when running that version.

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You should use for python3: '{0}'.format(var) Instead of '%s' %(var). See: docs.python.org/3.3/library/stdtypes.html#str.format –  shakaran Feb 18 '13 at 10:08
    
@skaran, you're right, but the questioner uses Python 2, not 3. I was only saying that super() could be used in all cases if he ever migrates to Python 3. –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 18 '13 at 10:09
1  
Just to expand - in Python 3, super() can be called without the arguments as it's implicit. In Python 2.x though, it's explicit so yeah, super(Dog, self) is needed. –  TyrantWave Feb 18 '13 at 10:11

You can reference the parent method in a couple of ways:

class Dog(Animal):
      def __unicode__(self):
           return 'this %s is a dog' % Animal.__unicode__(self)

class Dog(Animal):
     def __unicode__(self):
           return 'this %s is a dog' % super(Dog, self).__unicode__()

Note: In order to use super the parent class has to be a new style class. The second method will fail if used with an old style class like the one defined in the questions.

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1  
It's best when possible to check the code before you post. If you actually try your second suggestion, with the OPs definition of Animal running on Python 2 you get TypeError: must be type, not classobj –  Duncan Feb 18 '13 at 10:35
    
@Duncan OPs definition? –  Ifthikhan Feb 18 '13 at 10:38
    
@Duncan Thank you pointing out the issue. I did not observe that the Animal is an old style class. –  Ifthikhan Feb 18 '13 at 10:50

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