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I have a utility unit with code shared between a few applications and DLLs. I'd like to selectively compile portions of this unit based upon the current project type: Application, Package, or Library. I couldn't find any conditional definitions for a library or package in the System unit, and Google didn't find anything relevant. So, are there any conditional defines such as IsLibrary or IsPackage set by the compiler? I'm aware of the IsLibrary variable, by the way.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is no such pre-defined conditional, and there could not be such a conditional. That's because at compilation time it is impossible to know whether the unit will, ultimately, be linked into an executable, a library or a package.

In fact, the same compiled unit could be linked into any or all of the above project types. And indeed you can see this yourself when you link the RTL into your projects. You link the same System unit, the same compiled .dcu file, into all your projects, irrespective of the project type.

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So, the easiest way for me would be to include {$DEFINE Is...} on the first line of every project. Right? –  iMan Biglari Feb 18 '13 at 10:02
    
Basically yes, that's what you'd need to do. But to make it work you'd need to put it in a .inc file that you include everywhere, or in your project options. If it is defined in the .dpr file then it will only be visible from the .dpr file. –  David Heffernan Feb 18 '13 at 10:03
    
If I define it before the uses clause, won't it be visible inside used units? –  iMan Biglari Feb 18 '13 at 10:11
3  
No, that won't help. Conditionals defined in code only take effect in the unit in which they are defined. If you want to define it project wide it needs to be done in the project options. –  David Heffernan Feb 18 '13 at 10:12

there are no condition at all.

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IMHO there is absolute no need for such conditionals because of existing conventions.

Compiling an Application or Library (the same on this compiling aspect) or a Package differs like so:

  • Application/Library will compile only the used parts from the unit
  • Package will compile all parts from the unit referenced by the interface part of the unit

Example Unit

unit foo;

interface

procedure foo1;
procedure foo2;

implementation

procedure foo3; 
begin
  // used by foo2, compile depends on foo2 compilation
end;

procedure foo4;
begin
  // will never be compiled, because is never used
end;

procedure foo1;
begin
  // Package: will ever be compiled
  // Application/Library: will be compiled if used 
end;

procedure foo2;
begin
  // Package: will ever be compiled
  // Application/Library: will be compiled if used 

  foo3;

end;

end.

That is also a reason, why using packages may result in bigger exe files, because containing never used code parts from precompiled dcu files.

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Thanks for the explanation, but this is not my case exactly. This utility unit is using another units with initialization sections, which would be compiled and linked into my DLLs regardless of whether they are used or not. If I had the time, I would split the code in two separate units, but at the moment I can't afford it. –  iMan Biglari Feb 18 '13 at 12:19

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