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I'm trying to implement the Runge-Kutta Method for Systems of DEs in MATLAB. I'm not getting the correct answers, I'm not sure if there is something wrong in the code or the commands I use to run it.

Here's my code:

function RKSystems(a, b, m, N, alpha, f)
    h = (b - a)/N;
    t = a;
    w = zeros(1, m);

    for j = 1:m
        w(j) = alpha(j);
    end

    fprintf('t = %.2f;', t);
    for i = 1:m
        fprintf(' w(%d) = %.10f;', i, w(i));
    end
    fprintf('\n');

    k = zeros(4, m);
    for i = 1:N
        for j = 1:m
           k(1, j) = h*f{j}(t, w);
        end

        for j = 1:m
            k(2, j) = h*f{j}(t + h/2, w + (1/2)*k(1));
        end

        for j = 1:m
            k(3, j) = h*f{j}(t + h/2, w + (1/2)*k(2));
        end

        for j = 1:m
            k(4, j) = h*f{j}(t + h, w + k(3));
        end

        for j = 1:m
            w(j) = w(j) + (k(1, j) + 2*k(2, j) + 2*k(3, j) + k(4, j))/6;
        end

        t = a + i*h;

        fprintf('t = %.2f;', t);
        for k = 1:m
            fprintf(' w(%d) = %.10f;', k, w(k));
        end
        fprintf('\n');

    end 
end

I'm trying to test it out on this problem. Here are my commands and output:

>> U1 = @(t, u) 3*u(1) + 2*u(2) - (2*t^2 + 1)*exp(2*t);

>> U2 = @(t, u) 4*u(1) + u(2) + (t^2 + 2*t - 4)*exp(2*t);

>> a = 0; b = 1; alpha = [1 1]; m = 2; h = 0.2; N = (b - a)/h;

>> RKSystems(a, b, m, N, alpha, {U1 U2});

t = 0.00; w(1) = 1.0000000000; w(2) = 1.0000000000;

t = 0.20; w(1) = 2.2930309680; w(2) = 1.6186020410;

t = 0.40; w(1) = 5.0379629523; w(2) = 3.7300162165;

t = 0.60; w(1) = 11.4076339762; w(2) = 9.7009491301;

t = 0.80; w(1) = 27.0898576892; w(2) = 25.6603894354;

t = 1.00; w(1) = 67.1832886708; w(2) = 67.6103125539;

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You might be interested in MATLAB ode45 function that solves ODE’s with RK: mathworks.com/help/matlab/ref/ode45.html –  Roman Shapovalov Feb 18 '13 at 11:22

2 Answers 2

So... here is how I would do it, it is very difficult for me to read what is going on in your code snippet, but I hope this helps you out. Additionally, matlab has built in rk solvers I would suggest becoming familiar with those.

%rk4 solver
dt = .2;
t = 0:dt:1;
u = zeros(2,numel(t));
u(:,1) = 1;

for jj = 2:numel(t)
    u_ = u(:,jj-1);
    t_ = t(jj-1);
    fa = rhs(u_,t_);
    fb = rhs(u_+dt/2.*fa,t_+dt/2);
    fc = rhs(u_+dt/2.*fb,t_+dt/2);
    fd = rhs(u_+dt.*fc,t_+dt);
    u(:,jj) = u(:,jj-1) + dt/6*(fa+2*fb+2*fc+fd);
end
disp([t;u]')

and rhs.m is the following:

function dudt = rhs(u,t)
dudt = [(3*u(1) + 2*u(2) - (2*t^2 + 1)*exp(2*t));
        (4*u(1) + u(2) + (t^2 + 2*t - 4)*exp(2*t))];

This returns the following:

>> rkorder4
     0    1.0000    1.0000
0.2000    2.1204    1.5070
0.4000    4.4412    3.2422
0.6000    9.7391    8.1634
0.8000   22.6766   21.3435
1.0000   55.6612   56.0305

Alternatively, you could invoke ode45 with something like:

dt = .2;
t = 0:dt:1;
rhs=@(t,u)[(3*u(1) + 2*u(2) - (2*t^2 + 1)*exp(2*t));
        (4*u(1) + u(2) + (t^2 + 2*t - 4)*exp(2*t))];

[ts,us]=ode45(@(t,u) rhs(t,u),t,[1 1],[]);
disp([ts us]);

Which gives you:

                   0   1.000000000000000   1.000000000000000
   0.200000000000000   2.125018862140859   1.511597928697035
   0.400000000000000   4.465156492097592   3.266022178547346
   0.600000000000000   9.832481410895053   8.256418221678395
   0.800000000000000  23.003033457636558  21.669270713784108
   1.000000000000000  56.738351357036301  57.106230777717208

Which is pretty close to what you get from my code. The agreement between the two can be increased by decreasing the time step, dt. They will always be in greatest agreement at the low values of t with the difference between the two increasing as t increases. Both implementations are also in pretty close agreement with the analytic solutions.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool. Did you use the algorithm from the image I posted to come up with your version of the RK4, or did you use other sources? –  badjr Feb 19 '13 at 2:18
1  
I used some of my old code which was informed by the link at the end of this comment. As far as I can tell, the approach I took and the one from your image are equivalent. A great free resource for this kind of stuff is this textbook: courses.washington.edu/amath581/581.pdf –  johnish Feb 19 '13 at 3:49
    
@johnish very nice code! I have being studying both the question and the answer of this post because I am facing a big problem trying to solve a system (2x2) of first order odes. I have tried to use your codes but my problem is that I don't have an explicit function, I have a discrete function. This means that I have something like: U1 @(t,u) 3*P1*u(1).*P2*u(2) and U2 @(t,u) 34.5*P1*u(1).*P2*u(2) where P1,P2 are arrays(!) Any suggestion? –  Sergio Haram Oct 31 '14 at 9:26
    
@badjr I have being studying both the question and the answer of this post because I am facing a big problem trying to solve a system (2x2) of first order odes. I have tried to use your codes but my problem is that I don't have an explicit function, I have a discrete function. This means that I have something like: U1 @(t,u) 3*P1*u(1).*P2*u(2) and U2 @(t,u) 34.5*P1*u(1).*P2*u(2) where P1,P2 are arrays(!) Any suggestion? –  Sergio Haram Oct 31 '14 at 9:26
1  
@SergioHaram It has been a while since I've worked on this, so I don't remember the details. I see you have asked a separate question on your specific problem, which is probably the best thing to do. Hopefully someone else can answer your question. –  badjr Nov 2 '14 at 20:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

My problems were in the following lines of code:

k(2, j) = h*f{j}(t + h/2, w + (1/2)*k(1));

k(3, j) = h*f{j}(t + h/2, w + (1/2)*k(2));

k(4, j) = h*f{j}(t + h, w + k(3));

I was expecting k(1) to add the entire first row of k (a 4 by m matrix) to the matrix w (a 1 by m matrix), but it was only adding the first element of the first row. To fix it, I modified the lines as follows:

k(2, j) = h*f{j}(t + h/2, w + (1/2)*k(1, :));

k(3, j) = h*f{j}(t + h/2, w + (1/2)*k(2, :));

k(4, j) = h*f{j}(t + h, w + k(3, :));

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