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I always see constructors and destructors declared before anything else in a class. Is this just a nice coding standard that everyone uses to make it easier to find them or is there a reason behind it. For example, is there anything wrong with declaring a variable before the constructor like in the code below?

class A
{
     public:
         int aVar;
         A() :aVar(20) {}
         ~A() {}
};
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There is no "coding standard" for C++ (alas!). The reason behind it is probably simply that these are the first methods that get written. –  Johnsyweb Feb 18 '13 at 11:06
    
I put them first because they concern lifetime issues and initialisation. These are usually very different activities to the meat of the class, but immensely important to get right. So they come first, rather than as an afterthought. –  Peter Wood Feb 18 '13 at 14:36

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's no particular reason to declare constructors before everything else, it's just a convention, or a coding practice. It's like declaring public functions, then public members, then private functions, then private members, and order functions by alphabetical order.

The only ordering standard that has a reason is to not declare members by alphabetical order but by type size order, because it's a simple way to have a smaller class.

Personally, I put enums and typedefs before the constructor and destructor.

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1  
Not a standard, not even a de-facto standard. –  Peter Wood Feb 18 '13 at 10:43
1  
Not sure what you mean by standard; I would consider ordering functions by alphabetical order an anti-pattern. (You order first and foremost by functionality.) –  James Kanze Feb 18 '13 at 10:46
1  
Actually I have never heard of such standard.. maybe it's a sign of a good style, a best-pratice but definitely not a standard in any meaning. –  KBart Feb 18 '13 at 10:46
1  
@alestanis Very few C++ programmers (and none that I know) follow your "standard". And you've sited contradictory rules: I can't group constructors, destructor and assignment if I group by access. (One very frequent pattern has protected constructors, public destructor and private assignment.) –  James Kanze Feb 18 '13 at 10:48
1  
Members have to be declared in the order you need to initialize it –  qPCR4vir Feb 18 '13 at 10:51

Convention. Constructors are usually the first thing you want to know about—you can't do much until you have an object, and it just seems natural to put the destructor (and assignment) next to them. There are exceptions, though; a lot of people will group according to access, so if the constructors are protected, but the destructor public (and the assignment operator private), they won't necessarily be grouped.

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Not at all, it's just a matter of coding style.

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No reason at all, except personal preference. Methods placement is not relevant except for purely aesthetic reasons.

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I usually have separate sections in the class for the constructors and destructors, members and methods and separate all of these by public, private and protected. It makes sense to have the constructor first in the declaration as the constructor is usually the first thing you use out of a class. There are of course some exceptions for instance for singleton you usually never call the constructor.

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I'll often put static member functions before the constructor. –  James Kanze Feb 18 '13 at 10:44
    
@JamesKanze a matter of code style, no use for dispute which is the best one here. I just gave an example of lot I do. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 18 '13 at 10:45
    
I was actually seconding your point about the first thing you use. Since static member functions are often used even before you construct an object, I sometimes put them before the constructor. Same rationale that you gave –  James Kanze Feb 18 '13 at 11:03

Just good form really, it makes no difference to the interpreter and the form is probably a throwback to earlier languages which may have needed a function declared before it would be subsequently called...

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I've yet to use an interpreter with C++. And you do normally have to declare a function before using it (just not inside the class definition), but of course, you won't be using the constructor until the entire class is defined. –  James Kanze Feb 18 '13 at 10:43

To answer

is there anything wrong with declaring a variable before the constructor like in the code below?

Well, what's "wrong" with it is that you have a public variable. That's in principle ok as well, but most C++ programmers prefer to have either all variables private or all public (as a POD-struct).

Assuming you mean

class A {
  int aVar;
 public:
  A() : aVar(20) {}
  ~A() {}
};

that's perfectly fine indeed, in fact FWIW I like to put all the data members on top: it's IMO the first thing you need to know when trying to understand how a class works.
(Many programmers will now say it's not the primary purpose of the .h file to teach people how the class works, only what it's interface is. I disagree: that's what e.g. Doxygen documentation is there for; you'd only bother to look in the actual source code if you want to know about the internal implementation.)
Also, it's weird IMO to start all classes with the public keyword and then later revert it with private, but that's hardly an argument.

Of course, the whole thing really is about convention only: if all class declarions in a project have a certain layout, you should stick to that, everything else would be confusing.

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