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I'm having hard time to make my program work correctly. In brief, my program consists of several initial threads: Main, MessageReceiver, Scheduler (used Quartz package) and two types of threads scheduled by the Scheduler thread: TraceReader and ScheduledEvent. Now, when TraceReader is fired, it reads a special trace file and schedules events with start time, repeat interval (500ms to 1 sec) and end time. Currently, about 140 events can be scheduled to fire at the same time which causes lots of ConcurrentModificationException errors. Now some code:

public class Client { //main class
 public static volatile HashMap<Integer, Request> requests;
 public static class Request{
    String node;
    int file_id;
    long sbyte;
    int length;
    int pc_id;
    public Request(){

    }
 }

 public static synchronized void insertRequest(int req_nr, String node, int file_id, long sbyte, int length, int pc_id) {
    Request tempr = new Request();
    tempr.node = node;
    tempr.file_id = file_id;
    tempr.sbyte = sbyte;
    tempr.length = length;
    tempr.pc_id = pc_id;
    requests.put(req_nr, tempr);                       
 }

public static synchronized void doSynchronized(int req_nr, String node, int file_id, long sbyte, int length, int pc_id) {        
    reqnr++;
    String r = "P" + reqnr + "," + file_id + "," + Long.toString(sbyte) + "," + length;        
    insertRequest(Client.reqnr, node, file_id, sbyte, length, pc_id);        
}

public class ScheduledEvent implements Job {
 public synchronized boolean isRequested(long sbyte, int length, int file_id, String node) {
    Request req;
    Iterator<Integer> it = Client.requests.keySet().iterator();
    while (it.hasNext()) {
        req = Client.requests.get(it.next());
        if (req.node.equals(node) && req.file_id == file_id && hits(req.sbyte, req.length, sbyte, length)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
 }  
}

So I basically get errors for the ScheduledEvent class's isRequested method. Since there are more than 100 concurrent threads, I think the error caused by the fact that other threads are using Client.doSynchronized() while other threads try to iterate the request object in isRequested method. Is there any way to make the thread to access that object synchronized without using blocking (Thread.join() etc.)?

share|improve this question
    
A couple of style points: members of Request should be private and getters and setters added. Requests should also be private. Why are you using a bunch of static methods? They aren't going to help you to build something nice and extensible.. – pjp Sep 29 '09 at 16:15
    
Thanks for comment. I'm not very good at Java programming yet and don't really understand what those keywords do. The reason I have most of the method static is that I was getting "static access of non-static method" errors previously. – Azimuth Sep 29 '09 at 16:20
    
And if I will declare Requests private I will not be able to access it from another classes (ScheduledEvent for example) isn't it? – Azimuth Sep 29 '09 at 16:21
    
Request class is missing equals and hashCode. You should be able to use containsValue to search for the thing you want. However if you really want to be looking up things quickly from a map then they should be keys of the map O(1) lookup instead of O(n) search. Where is the method hits() defined? – pjp Sep 29 '09 at 16:22
    
hits defined in the same class, namely ScheduledEvent, here is the code for it pastebin.com/f20d037e5 – Azimuth Sep 29 '09 at 16:37

The basic problem with your code is that your objects synchronize on different objects (locks). To fix this, instead of declaring the methods synchronized - which synchronizes on the class's object - synchronize on the requests object itself:

public class Client { //main class

 public static void insertRequest(int req_nr, String node, int file_id, long sbyte, int length, int pc_id) {
    ...
    synchronized (requests) {
      requests.put(req_nr, tempr);
    }
    ...
 }

public class ScheduledEvent implements Job {
 public boolean isRequested(long sbyte, int length, int file_id, String node) {
    ...
    synchronized (requests) {
      while (it.hasNext()) {
          req = Client.requests.get(it.next());
          if (req.node.equals(node) && req.file_id == file_id && hits(req.sbyte,   req.length, sbyte, length)) {
            return true;
        }
      }
    }
    ...
 }  
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried that but it says "Synchronizing on non-final field" – Azimuth Sep 29 '09 at 16:03
    
Declare requests final; you probably won't change that reference anyway. – Zed Sep 29 '09 at 16:04
    
Make it final then public final static volatile HashMap<Integer, Request> requests; – pjp Sep 29 '09 at 16:05
    
OK. I will try. – Azimuth Sep 29 '09 at 16:07
    
Haha now it says final and volatile cannot be combined. Well, I will try with just final for now. – Azimuth Sep 29 '09 at 16:08

You could replace HashMap with ConcurrentHashMap.

http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/ConcurrentHashMap.html#keySet%28%29

keySet() Returns a set view of the keys contained in this map. The set is backed by the map, so changes to the map are reflected in the set, and vice-versa. The set supports element removal, which removes the corresponding mapping from this map, via the Iterator.remove, Set.remove, removeAll, retainAll, and clear operations. It does not support the add or addAll operations. The view's returned iterator is a "weakly consistent" iterator that will never throw ConcurrentModificationException, and guarantees to traverse elements as they existed upon construction of the iterator, and may (but is not guaranteed to) reflect any modifications subsequent to construction.

The ConcurrentModificationException occurs due to the Fail Fast nature of the iterator on the Maps keyset.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for reply. But as far as I heard ConcurrentHashMap is slower than HashMap. Do you know whether it is so? – Azimuth Sep 29 '09 at 16:13
1  
It's certainly going to be faster than synchronizing around a HashMap. This is because a ConcurrentHashMap has finer level locks on the individual buckets in the HashMap instead of one lock over the entire map. However your code is doing things like a linear search for a value so it's not going to be that fast anyway. – pjp Sep 29 '09 at 16:31
    
Thank you for your hints. Seems I will have to edit all my code. But anyway, it has to be done... – Azimuth Sep 29 '09 at 16:39

You should probably be using ConcurrentHashMap instead of HashMap, which will allow you to get rid of a lot of your manual synchronization.

UPDATE:

Looking at your question again, I have a couple of questions/suggestions:

  1. Does ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor do what you need? I highly recommend using the higher-level concurrency constructs provided in java.util.concurrent where possible, because it's so hard to get concurrency right when you're starting with just the basic concurrency primitives.
  2. Assuming the answer to the previous question is no, is there a reason you can't use a classic producer-consumer pattern using a Queue instead of a Map keyed on request number? It seems like one of the BlockingQueue implementations would be ideal for this.
share|improve this answer
    
ConcurrentHashMap only makes operations within the instance synchronized, but it has no way to ensure that different threads do not call different operations on the same instance at the same time, i.e. thread1 call Map.add() while thread2. is iterating over it. – matt b Sep 29 '09 at 16:19
    
The iterator in thread2 would see a snapshot of keySet before thread1 added its value. – pjp Sep 29 '09 at 16:53
    
I didn't know that ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor exists so I used Quartz library (www.opensymphony.com/quartz/). If I want to switch to ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor I will have to edit whole three programs...so I would prefer to stick to Quartz. As for the answer to the question 2, I don't clearly understand your question but I need request number because this program sends requests to another one by network, so I don't use procedure call in my project. – Azimuth Sep 29 '09 at 16:58
    
RE: Producer-Consumer -> There's a concurrency pattern called Producer-Consumer where 1 (or more, but 1 is pretty common) Producer objects (in this case, it sounds like TraceReader would be a Producer) pushes data onto a shared Queue which 1 (or more, usually more) Consumers poll for work. In your case, I'm not sure what the Consumer would be; I sort of get the impression that the ScheduledEvent class does its own work. – Hank Gay Sep 29 '09 at 20:05
    
Given your sample code, it looks like reqnr is a static property of Client. You should be aware that ++reqnr is not atomic. You would need to use an AtomicLong from the JDK instead of an int or long and use it's incrementAndGet instead of the ++ operator. – Hank Gay Sep 29 '09 at 20:07

You are A) misunderstanding the use of the volatile keyword, and B) misunderstanding the use of synchronized. This can be a tricky subject so I'll try and give a brief overview of both.

volatile tells the compiler that the variable being referred may be updated by multiple threads, so it must ensure that each thread sees the correct value when it reads/writes to the variable. The reason you are misusing volatile is that when you declare a volatile Object you are telling the compiler the reference is volatile. Ie, the pointer to the HashMap could change at any time (for instance, if you did requests = new HashMap() the pointer would have changed). You are not changing the reference to requests at any time in your program however, so it does nothing to declare it volatile, and as mentioned in another answer, you should declare it final.

synchronized is a keyword that is essentially a shortcut for a lock() on some object. When you use synchronized within the context of an instance of a class, synchronized will lock on the instance. Ie:

class X {
  public synchronized doStuff() {
    ...
  }
}

X instance = new X();
instance.doStuff();

will have the exact same effect as:

class X {
  public doStuff() {
    lock(this) { // or lock(instance)
      ...
    }
  }
}

If you use synchronized in a static context however, the lock generate by synchronized has no instance to lock on, so instead it will lock on the instance of the class type. To simplify, for every class that uses synchronized statements, a synchronized in a static context will lock on lock 1 in all cases, and a synchronized in a non-static context will lock on lock 2 every time. This means there is no multithreading safety unless you make sure things are using the same lock.

One way of making your code work is to use lock(requests) statements explicitly so they all share the same lock. It is not always best practice to actually lock on the object you want to use, rather usually people create a new Object to lock on and not to use for any other purpose to avoid confusion.

Other responses have mentioned using ConcurrentHashMap, this is a valid solution although those answers do not address the root problem here. If you decide to use ConcurrentHashMap however, be sure you understand what safety guarantees it does and does not give you with respect to concurrent modification. It may not always be as you expect.

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