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I have the following setup and it seems that my object cannot be converted to the generic type. While it is actually the base class. Why doesn't this work? It seems so logical to me.

public class AList<T> where T : A
{
    void DoStuff(T foo)
    {
    }

    void CallDoStuff()
    {
        DoStuff(new A()); // ERROR: Cannot convert A to T
    }
}

public class A
{
}
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My +1 because sometimes, there is some errors that open our eyes for even new (and further) dimensions in our lovely C# language. –  Kenan F. Deen Feb 18 '13 at 11:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem here is that the constraint says that T must be A or a class derived from A.
Now, when you instantiate AList with a concrete type, T is a very specific class. And if you didn't instantiate AList with A itself but with a subclass of it, T is a subclass of A.

You can't convert an instance with a runtime type of the base class to one of its subclasses, as it misses all the information that is being added by the subclass.

Example:

public class Animal
{
    public int Foo { get; set; }
}

public class Cat : Animal
{
    public int Bar { get; set; }
}

Derived d = new Base();

Would you expect that code to work? Surely not, because a Cat is also a Animal but a Animal is not a Cat.
If you would expect the above code to actually work, ask yourself what is supposed to happen when the following code is executed: d.Bar = 42;
Animal doesn't contain a definition for Bar.

The same is happening in your code - it's just a little bit more obscured with the generics in the game.

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Ok, now that makes sense. I just forgot that this explicit typing obliges me to make sure that all objects here could be of <B>, instead of <A>. So maybe I shouldn't use generics in the first place if I want to do this. –  Marnix Feb 18 '13 at 11:22
    
@Marnix: Correct. If you don't want to enforce a certain subclass of A but want to allow all subclasses and A itself at the same time: Don't use generics. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 18 '13 at 11:23

T could be also a class that derives from A so you can't put instance of A as a parameter of type T. Something like invoking method, that takes int with and argument that is of type object.

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This is the same reason that is an object can not be converted to int implicitly.

The method expects a child class and you are passing the parent, so you need an explicit cast.

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Yes, it only works with a T or one of its sub-classes. –  Kenan F. Deen Feb 18 '13 at 11:22

Because you are asking T to extend A. So you can replace T with A but not A with T.

if Cat : Animal it doesn't mean you can always convert an Animal to a Cat.

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Good logic, I would put is this way "if Cat : Animal, it does not means that ANY Animal is a Cat". –  Kenan F. Deen Feb 18 '13 at 11:19

Try and use Activator to give you an instance of A from T because you know that T has to be A due to your constraint, so there isn't a need to use new A() anywhere as you have T, so you can just create an instance of T.

T obj = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
DoStuff(obj);

Or do a cast of your object as other answers have mentioned, however this will not work in all cases.

T obj = (T)new A();
DoStuff(obj);
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