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Is there a way to update a maximum from multiple threads using atomic operations?

Illustrative example:

std::vector<float> coord_max(128);
#pragma omp parallel for
for (int i = 0; i < limit; ++i) {
    int j = get_coord(i); // can return any value in range [0,128)
    float x = compute_value(j, i);
    #pragma omp critical (coord_max_update)
    coord_max[j] = std::max(coord_max[j], x);
}

In the above case, the critical section synchronizes access to the entire vector, whereas we only need to synchronize access to each of the values independently.

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2  
you cannot use the new std::atomic<float>? –  Nim Feb 18 '13 at 11:29
2  
OpenMP provides its own set of fine-grained locking functions in the omp_*_lock() family. But the real question is: do you really need fine-grained locking? The whole coord_max vector spans 8 cache lines on x86/x64 and as get_coord() returns values scattered throughout the whole spectrum, there is a big chance that false sharing would occur on each store - this could be more detrimental to the execution speed than the synchronised code section. –  Hristo Iliev Feb 18 '13 at 13:06
    
@Nim - is std::atomic<float> lock-free? I suspect it's not. –  Krzysztof Kosiński Feb 19 '13 at 16:26
    
There is no "lock", I suggest you watch this presentation by Sutter: channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Going+Deep/… –  Nim Feb 19 '13 at 16:37

4 Answers 4

Not sure about the syntax, but algorithmically, you have three choices:

  1. Lock down the entire vector to guarantee atomic access (which is what you are currently doing).

  2. Lock down individual elements, so that every element can be updated independent of others. Pros: maximum parallelism; Cons: lots of locks required!

  3. Something in-between! Conceptually think of partitioning your vector into 16 (or 32/64/...) "banks" as follows: bank0 consists of vector elements 0, 16, 32, 48, 64, ... bank1 consists of vector elements 1, 17, 33, 49, 65, ... bank2 consists of vector elements 2, 18, 34, 50, 66, ... ... Now, use 16 explicit locks before you access the element and you can have upto 16-way parallelism. To access element n, acquire lock (n%16), finish the access, then release the same lock.

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2  
It might make more sense to have 8 banks, each spanning 16 consecutive elements, so that locking is performed on a cache-line basis. The bank number would be then n >> 4. The 16 elements figure is for x86/x64 where the L1 cache line size is 64 bytes - it might be different on other platforms. –  Hristo Iliev Feb 18 '13 at 13:19
    
An excellent suggestion, Hristo! –  Rahul Banerjee Feb 18 '13 at 21:49

How about declaring, say, a std::vector<std::mutex> (or boost::mutex) of length 128 and then creating a lock object using the jth element?

I mean, something like:

std::vector<float> coord_max(128);
std::vector<std::mutex> coord_mutex(128); 
#pragma omp parallel for
for (int i = 0; i < limit; ++i) {
    int j = get_coord(i); // can return any value in range [0,128)
    float x = compute_value(j, i);
    std::scoped_lock lock(coord_mutex[j]);
    coord_max[j] = std::max(coord_max[j], x);     
}

Or, as per Rahul Banerjee's suggestion #3:

std::vector<float> coord_max(128);
const int parallelism = 16;
std::vector<std::mutex> coord_mutex(parallelism); 
#pragma omp parallel for
for (int i = 0; i < limit; ++i) {
    int j = get_coord(i); // can return any value in range [0,128)
    float x = compute_value(j, i);
    std::scoped_lock lock(coord_mutex[j % parallelism]);
    coord_max[j] = std::max(coord_max[j], x);     
}
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Just to add my two cents, before starting more fine-grained optimizations I would try the following approach that removes the need for omp critical:

std::vector<float> coord_max(128);  
float              fbuffer(0);
#pragma omp parallel 
{
  std::vector<float> thread_local_buffer(128);  

  // Assume limit is a really big number
  #pragma omp for       
  for (int ii = 0; ii < limit; ++ii) {
   int  jj = get_coord(ii); // can return any value in range [0,128)
   float x = compute_value(jj,ii);
   thread_local_buffer[jj] = std::max(thread_local_buffer[jj], x);
  } 
  // At this point each thread has a partial local vector
  // containing the maximum of the part of the problem 
  // it has explored

  // Reduce the results
  for( int ii = 0; ii < 128; ii++){
    // Find the max for position ii
#pragma omp for schedule(static,1) reduction(max:fbuffer)
    for( int jj = 0; jj < omp_get_thread_num(); jj++) {
      fbuffer = thread_local_buffer[ii];
    } // Barrier implied here
    // Write it in the vector at correct position
#pragma omp single
    {
      coord_max[ii] = fbuffer;
      fbuffer = 0;
    } // Barrier implied here

  }
}

Notice that I didn't compile the snippet, so I might have left some syntax error inside. Anyhow I hope I have conveyed the idea.

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Following a suggestion in a comment, I found a solution that does not require locking and instead uses the compare-and-exchange functionality found in std::atomic / boost::atomic. I am limited to C++03 so I would use boost::atomic in this case.

BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(sizeof(int) == sizeof(float));
union FloatPun { float f; int i; };

std::vector< boost::atomic<int> > coord_max(128);
#pragma omp parallel for
for (int i = 0; i < limit; ++i) {
    int j = get_coord(i);
    FloatPun x, maxval;
    x.f = compute_value(j, i);

    maxval.i = coord_max[j].load(boost::memory_order_relaxed);
    do {
        if (maxval.f >= x.f) break;
    } while (!coord_max[j].compare_exchange_weak(maxval.i, x.i,
        boost::memory_order_relaxed));
}

There is some boilerplate involved in putting float values in ints, since it seems that atomic floats are not lock-free. I am not 100% use about the memory order, but the least restrictive level 'relaxed' seems to be OK, since non-atomic memory is not involved.

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