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I have image of Tiger's Pugmark (footprint impression) in mud. I want to detect the boundary of the pugmark but the image is uniform in intensity that is foreground and background cannot be distinguished based on intensity variations. What can i do to distinguish between the pugmark and the background.!

tiger's pugmark

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The problem is probably more difficult than you think. It may help if you elaborate on the further usage of that boundary, i.e. what precision do you need? If you want just detect the pugmark, or know its direction, a precise boundary is unnecessary. –  Roman Shapovalov Feb 18 '13 at 12:11
    
you are doomed. :-(..... This is an extremely difficult image processing task. –  Shai Feb 18 '13 at 13:23
    
@RomanShapovalov Let me tell you why specifically i need to mark the boundaries and discard the irrelevant region. I need to analyse the pugmark and based on some selected features like Pad area, toe area, angle between toe 2 and 3 , pugmark length, breadth, etc. and then after comparing the analysed image with the training set i must be able to distinguish which tiger's pugmark it is. –  Suvidha Feb 19 '13 at 6:43
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In segmentation tasks if you have both

  1. Good markers; and
  2. Strong edges around the object of interest

then it is directly solved by a Watershed Transform. The problem, of course, is obtaining these markers, as well enhancing relevant edges as needed. Obtaining these might involve problem-specific knowledge, which I don't have for your problem.

Nevertheless, there are some general methods that might be useful. For instance, connected operators from Mathematical Morphology serve as a way to merge and extend flat zones. Thus, maybe it can give us relatively good markers for the problem. In the following image a morphological reconstruction by opening (a kind of connected operator) was performed in the grayscale version of the original image (left image), and the remaining regional maximum is shown at right.

enter image description here enter image description here

Now, we can obtain the morphological gradient of the left image above. We can also do hole filling and a dilation with a small disk in the right image above to obtain more smooth contours -- this defines our marker image. Then, applying a Watershed Transform in the gradient image using our marker image, and then expanding (erode or dilate, depends on how you see it) the watershed lines, we get the following image:

enter image description here

I suspect that you can discard too large and too small regions easily. Then, if you have some rough expected sizes for the claws, as well for the palm, you can discard the irrelevant regions. At this point it is only a matter of dilating the areas to form a single component and show the resulting contour in the original image:

enter image description here

Sample code for performing each step (the relevant steps are also shown in commented Matlab code):

f = Import["http://imageshack.us/a/img407/4636/p1060993g.jpg"]
g = ColorConvert[f, "Grayscale"]                           (* g = rgb2gray(f); *)
(* First image shown: *)
geo = GeodesicOpening[g, DiskMatrix[5]]  (* geo = imreconstruct(imerode(g, ... *)
                                         (*         strel('disk', 6)), g);     *)
(* Second image shown: *)
marker = MaxDetect[geo]                        (* marker = imregionalmax(geo); *)

(* Watershed on gradient with markers. *)
mgrad = ImageSubtract[Dilation[geo, 1], Erosion[geo, 1]]; (* mgrad = ...       *)
          (* imdilate(geo,strel('square',3)) - imerode(geo,strel('square',3)); *)
ws = Image[           (* ws = watershed(imimposemin(mgrad, bwmorph(imfill(...  *)
 WatershedComponents[mgrad,      (* imregionalmax(geo),'holes'),'dilate'))));  *)
  Dilation[FillingTransform[marker], DiskMatrix[1]]]]

(* Third image shown: *)
wsthick = Erosion[ws // ImageAdjust, DiskMatrix[5]]

(* Connected component selection based on some supposed sizes. *)
ccs = SelectComponents[wsthick, "Count", 1000 < # < 3000 || 6000 < # < 10000 &]

(* Final image (thick border on binarized filled dilated ccs) *)
res = ImageAdd[f, Dilation[MorphologicalPerimeter[FillingTransform[
     MorphologicalPerimeter[Dilation[ccs, DiskMatrix[9]]]]], 2]]
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Thank you for the answer. Let me tell you why specifically i need to mark the boundaries and discard the irrelevant region. I need to analyse the pugmark and based on some selected features like Pad area, toe area, angle between toe 2 and 3 , pugmark length, breadth, etc. and then after comparing the analysed image with the training set i must be able to distinguish which tiger's pugmark it is. –  Suvidha Feb 19 '13 at 5:21
    
@user2067773 Ok, I just don't know why you are telling me that. But it seems like you are skipping one step in this method you described: first you need to have a method to determine whether what you have is a pugmark or not, otherwise it is pointless to analyze it. –  mmgp Feb 19 '13 at 5:40
    
yeah u are right. i haven't thought about it. But my first concern is to mask the background and obtain a clear image of the pugmark for further analysis. –  Suvidha Feb 19 '13 at 5:48
    
@Suvidha sure, for this example your mask is ready. Just consider all the pixels inside the white contour: i.imgur.com/W0MFYmQ.png. The idea to take from the answer is the acquisition and use of markers in a segmentation by watershed (which here was done by considering the gradient, a common approach). –  mmgp Feb 19 '13 at 5:56
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@Suvidha I've added mathematica code with the most non-obvious steps in matlab too. –  mmgp Feb 20 '13 at 13:46
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The approach in the @mmpg’s answer may be unstable, since the used algorithms require setting of parameters, which may be specific for each image. This problem seems to be better approached with parametric models that have prior knowledge about the shape.

Active Shape Models framework iteratively approximates the boundary of the shape. First, you initialize it with some average shape (images are just illustrations, not the actual output of the algorithm):

Initialization of the shape

The contour is defined by the anchor points (shown by blue ticks, only for the palm to avoid clutter). In each iteration the algorithm considers orthogonal directions in each anchor point and estimates the probability of the boundary at each distance (usually using the image gradient, but in your case it should be more complicated — may be the difference in texture, e.g. distance between histograms of textons). Here red points highlight arg-maximums of that distributions:

Modes of the edge-ness distribution

Then the new contour is fit to the data to maximize those distributions multiplied by the prior distribution of the shape. Assuming the uniform prior, the new contour would look like this:

The new contour

In practice you would like to have a non-trivial shape distribution. To estimate that, you will need a training set of images where the pugmark masks are manually labelled.

You may want to try this MATLAB implementation.

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