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There are many questions and answers for this, but I can't really find why we need to return by reference.

If we have (assume operator is already correctly overloaded for an object MyObject) :

    MyObject obj1;
    MyObject obj2;
    cout << obj1 << obj2;

Now, there will be subexpressions like ((cout << obj1) << obj2)); The question is why can we not return by value ? (Ok, let's assume that it's allowed return ostream as value) If cout << obj1 return a stream object instead of a reference, what is the difference ? Why is chaining impossible then ? Just as with overloading of the '=' operator, we can't chain like A=B=C=D if we return by value. Why ?


Thank you for answers. I realize that I can chain without return by reference, but my output is quite different when overloading '='. If I write :

    class Blah{
    public:
       Blah();
       Blah(int x, int y);
       int x;
       int y;
       Blah operator =(Blah rhs);
     };
     Blah::Blah(){}
     Blah::Blah(int xp, int yp){
       x = xp;
       y = yp;
     }
     Blah Blah::operator =(Blah rhs){
       Blah ret;
       ret.x = rhs.x;
       ret.y = rhs.y;
       return ret;
     }
    int main(){

      Blah b1(2,3);
      Blah b2(4,1);
      Blah b3(8,9);
      Blah b4(7,5);
      b3 = b4 = b2 = b1;
      cout << b3.x << ", " << b3.y << endl;
      cout << b4.x << ", " << b4.y << endl;
      cout << b2.x << ", " << b2.y << endl;
      cout << b1.x << ", " << b1.y << endl;
          return 0;
     }

The output from this is : 8,9 7,5 4,1 2,3

But if I overload with return by reference and set the parameter as reference, and modify and return *this when overloading instead, I get : 2,3 2,3 2,3 2,3

What is the reason no objects are altered in the first example ? Is it because of lvalues vs rvalues ? How about shorthand operators in comparison?


Ok, another update. As mentioned, the correct result should be 2,3 for all. However, if I write the overloaded operator as :

     Blah Blah::operator =(Blah rhs){
       x = rhs.x;
       y = rhs.y;
       return *this;
     }

Then, I will get correct results. (2,3 2,3 2,3 2,3). What happens to *this ? The overloaded operator update the lhs with rhs in the overload function, but returning *this seem to be pointless. Where does *this end up in : b3 = b4 = b2 = b1 ? Will it try to return to the left, so that it actually returns nothing when the chain reaches b3 (That will try to return to the left)?

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Because you want to continue insertting into the same stream. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 18 '13 at 11:44
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4 Answers

The main reason is because returning by value makes a copy, and iostream objects are not copyable. They have state and identity, and it's not clear what copying them should mean: the object contains (logically, at least) its position in the stream, so if I create a copy, I have two objects which will write at the same position in the stream.

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Returning by value does not prevent chaining. But if you return by value, you're returning a copy, which is generally not what you want in this case.

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Blah Blah::operator =(Blah rhs){
   Blah ret;
   ret.x = rhs.x;
   ret.y = rhs.y;
   return ret;
 }
  Blah b1(2,3);
  Blah b2(4,1);
  Blah b3(8,9);
  Blah b4(7,5);
  b3 = b4 = b2 = b1;

b3 is going to take in b4 as its rhs, but you are not actually modifying the value of b3, you are making a new variable of the same type Blah and returning it to null (in this case null means nothing because there is nothing to the left of b3. Even if there was something to the left of b3, it would not make a difference as another Blah variable would do the same thing as b3 and b4 did.

In fact if you had another class (say CoolClass that also has and x and y) and overloaded the assignment operator to take in a blah variable and have it actually modify the its own x and y you would find that.

coolObject = b3 = b4 = b2 = b1; //CoolObject.x = 2, CoolObject.y = 3

I'm still not exactly sure what your major complaint is with passing by reference. Here is how I would write that operator for Blah.

Blah & Blah::operator = (const Blah & rhs) { x = rhs.x; y = rhs.y; return *this; }

This guarantees that your rhs is non mutable and that chaining behavior works properly.

If you are looking for better behavior with a different kind of object, say the ostream for instance, it can sometimes be helpful to declare a friend function. These are functions that you can declare in your new class, but don't belong to the class directly. The benefit of this approach is to have a operator that looks like it comes from ostream class, but it is in the Blah class instead. You can still use private and protected members inside a friend function which makes them useful.

friend std::ostream & Blah::operator << (std::ostream & lhs, const Blah & rhs)
{ return lhs << "{" << rhs.x << ", " << rhs.y << "}"; }

What this does is pass around the same ostream object and fills it with data in order of precedence. The exact same behavior you would expect to find with regular text and ostream.

Using your first example you can think of it this way. Assuming obj1 and obj2 are both Blah, the cout object takes in obj1 via the friend function and returns the same cout object modified by the data in obj1, then the newly modified cout object takes in obj2 are returns the same modified cout object again, but now its also being modified by obj2 as well.

(cout << obj1) << obj2;
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Thank you! It is much more clear to me now. However, I am still a little confused about this : Blah Blah::operator =(const Blah rhs){ x = rhs.x; y = rhs.y; return *this; } This gives the same behaviour as returning by reference. Maybe because I already modify the left hand object ? But I don't see what happens to return *this –  user1511956 Feb 18 '13 at 21:43
    
When you return *this you are de-referencing the address of your object. That means you are returning the value of the object the this is pointing to. I added some more detail on ostream to my post, but i don't know if this is what your looking for. –  Haywire Spark Feb 19 '13 at 12:33
    
hmm, ok. But what I noticed was that when writing b3 = b2 = b4 = b1, I get correct behaviour when returning by value if i return *this (When overloading as in my previous comment). I don't see where the *this pointer actually return in the chain of assignments w.r.t that return by value is used. I see that the lhs objects get their value because of x=rhs.x; y=rhs.y; but I have no idea what happens to *this. Does *this just try to return to the left kind of ? So that *this does actually not return anything to any of the objects ? –  user1511956 Feb 20 '13 at 8:04
    
All *this means is return by value which you wanted. When I say value of this I mean the data inside of object (you might want to review c/c++ pointers). Returns only work in the left direction. You can operate on something from the right of a returned object like in my cout example, but that operation will still only return to the left. –  Haywire Spark Feb 20 '13 at 14:03
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Blah Blah::operator =(Blah rhs){
Blah ret;
ret.x = rhs.x;
ret.y = rhs.y;
return ret;
}-->(1)

Blah b1(2,3);
Blah b2(4,1);
Blah b3(8,9);
Blah b4(7,5);

b3 = b4 = b2 = b1;---->(2)

By invoking (2) you will call =() and Here in the above snippet(1) you are returning a temporary object .Note that you are not updating the x value of the actual object.For eg operation starts like this b2(x,y) = b1(2,3) and you are initialising the value 2 & 3 in the temporary object ret and returning the temporary object by value .so that temporary object is now going to invoke b4 ie b4 = temp(2,3) and again the same funda.you will copy 2 & 3 to b4 and returns a temp object which is invoking b3 as b3 = temp(2,3).Now if you replace (2) like this printed cout << b3=b4=b2=b1 (provided implement << overloading),you would have got 2 & 3 as output because 2 & 3 will be avilable only in this line.In your example you are printing in the next lines where this value is not available only because you are not updating the value of x & y in the object which invoked .So for that to work out you should return *this as a reference which means you are returning the object which invoked the function .SO if you do b2=b1 and return *this ,ie means you are returning the actual object and x,y value of actual object is getting updated and it will be available as long as the object exists.

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