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I work with Z3 4.3.1 (from master branch) under MacOS X 10.8. I get a segmentation fault on following example:

(declare-const a Int)
(declare-const b Int)

(assert
  (exists ((k Int))
    (and 
     (= (- (* 2 k) a) 0)
     (= (- (* 2 k) b) 0)
    )
  )
)


(check-sat-using qe)

Any idea, on how to fix this problem ?

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2 Answers 2

I managed to reproduce the bug you described using OSX and Z3 4.3.1. This bug has been fixed and will be available in the next official release. In the meantime, you can use the nightly build for OSX or build Z3 using the unstable (working-in-progress) branch.

The nightly build can be downloaded at: http://z3.codeplex.com/releases. We have to click at the "Planned" link. I wrote some instructions here.

BTW, if we want to check satisfiability, we should use an end-game tactic (such as smt) after qe, like in the example posted by Axel. If we want to inspect the result produced by qe, we should use (apply qe) instead.

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Thanks Leonardo. I fixed the bug by adding a missing ref on an expr in src/muz_qe/qe_arith_plugin.cpp (line 527): // a*s + b*t + (a-1)(b-1) <= 0 expr_ref aux(m_arith.mk_add(as_bt, slack), m); mk_le(aux, result1); Is it your fix ? –  user2083098 Feb 19 '13 at 13:50
    
I had the bug even with "(then qe smt)" tactic. –  user2083098 Feb 19 '13 at 13:54

The following works ok under Windows XP + Z3 4.3.0

(declare-const a Int)
(declare-const b Int)

(assert
  (exists ((k Int))
    (and 
     (= (- (* 2 k) a) 0)
     (= (- (* 2 k) b) 0)
    )
  )
)
(check-sat-using (then qe smt))
(get-model)
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Thanks, but my initial strategy was (then simpligy solve-eqs qe smt). I isolated the one (i.e. "qe") that actually yields the segmentation fault. –  user2083098 Feb 18 '13 at 14:58
    
'(check-sat-using qe)' works also, but yields "unknown" in my installation. –  Axel Kemper Feb 18 '13 at 15:24
    
qe is a preprocessing step. If we want to check satisfiability, we should use an end-game tactic (such as smt) after qe, like in the example posted by Axel. If we want to inspect the result produced by qe, we should use (apply qe) instead. –  Leonardo de Moura Feb 19 '13 at 0:35

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