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I happen to run into the source of std::find and find it confusing to me. Basically it divides the count of items by 4 and do the compare 4 in each round:

template<typename _RandomAccessIterator, typename _Tp>
_RandomAccessIterator
__find(_RandomAccessIterator __first, _RandomAccessIterator __last,
   const _Tp& __val, random_access_iterator_tag)
{
  typename iterator_traits<_RandomAccessIterator>::difference_type
__trip_count = (__last - __first) >> 2;

  for (; __trip_count > 0; --__trip_count)
{
  if (*__first == __val)
    return __first;
  ++__first;

  if (*__first == __val)
    return __first;
  ++__first;

  if (*__first == __val)
    return __first;
  ++__first;

  if (*__first == __val)
    return __first;
  ++__first;
}

  switch (__last - __first)
{
case 3:
  if (*__first == __val)
    return __first;
  ++__first;
case 2:
  if (*__first == __val)
    return __first;
  ++__first;
case 1:
  if (*__first == __val)
    return __first;
  ++__first;
case 0:
default:
  return __last;
}
}

I have no idea why it's done this way. Looks like some optimization. But I don't think this will take advantage of multi-core that easy. This is in a single thread anyway.

Any ideas?

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4  
Looks like manual loop unrolling. Whence is this implementation? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 18 '13 at 12:35
    
For one thing, it spends less time comparing __trip_count to zero and more time actually comparing values. –  Bo Persson Feb 18 '13 at 12:38
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Looks like loop unwinding, also known as loop unrolling.

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It's loop unrolling. The result is the same, but it's friendlier for the processor.

The asymptotic complexity is the same though.

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Not being completely sure, I think this is kind of a loop unrolling.

See Loop unrolling in : http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/6154/Writing-Efficient-C-and-C-Code-Optimization

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It's Duff's device. It's an old optimisation technic which mixes while and switch statements in an special way. It uses loop unroling. In assembler you would jump right inside an unrolled loop.

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4  
It's not Duff's device, the switch statement isn't inside the loop. Quite possibly the emitted code would be smaller if it did use Duff's device, though. –  Steve Jessop Feb 18 '13 at 12:43
    
Ok my fault. I didn't read the code carefull enough. –  Jan Herrmann Feb 18 '13 at 12:46
    
@SteveJessop: I was under the impression you put duff's device at the end of the unrolled loop not inside it. Only the last iteration is going to have a non full count. –  Loki Astari Feb 18 '13 at 14:53
    
@LokiAstari: no, that's not correct. Duff's invention was specifically the (ab)use of the C switch construct to jump into the middle of an unrolled loop, where "the middle" is "the number of iterations required modulo the length of the unroll". So in fact it's the first iteration that doesn't have a full count. –  Steve Jessop Feb 18 '13 at 15:09
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