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i am trying to print all root to leaf paths in a binary tree using java.

public void printAllRootToLeafPaths(Node node,ArrayList path) 
{
    if(node==null)
    {
        return;
    }
    path.add(node.data);

    if(node.left==null && node.right==null)
    {
        System.out.println(path);
        return;
    }
    else
    {
        printAllRootToLeafPaths(node.left,path);
        printAllRootToLeafPaths(node.right,path);
    }      
}

In main method:

 bst.printAllRootToLeafPaths(root, new ArrayList());

But its giving wrong output.

given tree:

   5
  / \
 /   \
1     8
 \    /\
  \  /  \
  3  6   9

Expected output:

[5, 1, 3]

[5, 8, 6]

[5, 8, 9]

But the output produced:

[5, 1, 3]

[5, 1, 3, 8, 6]

[5, 1, 3, 8, 6, 9]

Can some one figure it out...

share|improve this question
2  
We need more information to help you out. "But its giving wrong output." --> What's your input? What output do you expect (and why) and what's the actual output? –  jlordo Feb 18 '13 at 12:56
    
thanks for the suggestion. But the other guys understood my problem and gave the required answer... –  loknath Feb 18 '13 at 13:15
    
@jlordo: Input is obviously a tree given a root node. And expected output is: All paths from root to leaf.(Clearly mentioned in the question). And wrong output means : expected output is not coming... –  loknath Feb 18 '13 at 13:20
1  
Here's the Stack Overflow question checklist on how to write a good question. One bullet point: If your program produces different results to what you expected, have you stated what you expected, why you expected it, and the actual results? –  jlordo Feb 18 '13 at 13:24
    
@loknath the fact that people guess right does not mean that your question was as clear as it could / should have been. Please do check out the checklist jlordo posted. –  akaIDIOT Feb 18 '13 at 13:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Call the recursive methods with:

printAllRootToLeafPaths(node.left, new ArrayList(path));
printAllRootToLeafPaths(node.right, new ArrayList(path));

What happens there when you pass the path (instead of new ArrayList(path) is that you use a single object in all methods call, which means that, when you return to the original caller, the object is not in the same state as it was.

You just need to create a new object and initialize it to the original values. This way the original object does not get modified.

share|improve this answer
    
This really works, but I don't know what" new ArrayList(path)" is doing. Is it completely create a new path list, or it writes over the previous paths. When we say new, does not mean that we reset the path? I am just new to programming, your help is appreciated, thanks. –  seriously divergent Jul 31 at 17:59
1  
If it was parameterless (ie. just new ArrayList()), then yeah, it would be a new, empty, list. With the parameter path, however, it creates a new list and then copies the values from the path list. This way the content of the original list, that is path, does not get overwritten. You merely use the values of the original list, not the list itself. :) –  Filip B. Vondrášek Jul 31 at 22:18
    
thank you very much, now it makes sense to me :) –  seriously divergent Aug 1 at 5:52

You're passing your list along recursively, but that is a mutable object, so all the calls will modify it (by calling List.add) and mangle your results. Try cloning / copying the path argument to all the recursive calls to provide each branch (harhar) with its own context.

share|improve this answer
public void PrintAllPossiblePath(Node node,List<Node> nodelist)
{
    if(node != null)
    {
            nodelist.add(node);
            if(node.left != null)
            {
                PrintAllPossiblePath(node.left,nodelist);
            }
            if(node.right != null)
            {
                PrintAllPossiblePath(node.right,nodelist);
            }
            else if(node.left == null && node.right == null)
            {

            for(int i=0;i<nodelist.size();i++)
            {
                System.out.print(nodelist.get(i)._Value);
            }
            System.out.println();
            }
            nodelist.remove(node);
    }
}

nodelist.remove(node) is the key, it removes the element once it prints the respective path

share|improve this answer
    
Running your solution works. nodelist, like node, is a local variable. Say a node has 2 children and it processed the left subtree. When going back to the node and visiting the right child, why does nodelist have nodes from the left subtree? Since nodelist is local shouldnt it remember the list from that stackframe, where it has no knowledge of the left subtree? Same reason that node would not be a value from the left subtree, because it was popped off. –  HukeLau_DABA Aug 3 '14 at 16:18
    
Nice one!!!! +1 –  dragon66 Jun 19 at 23:37
    
@Jeevan when I write List<Node> L = new List<Node>() , it gives an error, and says remove the type argument. Do you know why? ( java.awt.List is imported) –  seriously divergent Aug 1 at 18:19

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