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I have a problem about the last part of the code. I want to assign numbers to specific words but i always get 0 value, even though I get those strings from the first System.out.println correctly, i cannot get the numerical equivalents of those strings at the second System.out.println.Any ideas how to solve this problem?

public static double number;

protected void myMethod(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) {

    String speech= request.getParameter("speech");
    System.out.println("The recognized speech is : "+ speech);

    // There is no problem till here.
    if(speech == "Hi")
        number = 1 ;
    if(speech== "Thanks")
        number = 2 ;
    if(speech== "Bye")
        number = 0 ;

    System.out.println("The number for the speech is : " + number);
}

However here i dont get the correct numbers but only 0 for each word!

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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can't use the == operator to check if two Strings have the same value in Java, you need to use the .equals() or equalsIgnoreCase() methods instead:

if("Hi".equalsIgnoreCase(speech)) {
    number = 1;
}
else if("Thanks".equalsIgnoreCase(speech)) {
    number = 2;
}
else if("Bye".equalsIgnoreCase(speech)) {
    number = 0;
}
else {
    number = -1;
}

The reason for this is that the == operator compares references; that is it will return true if and only if the instance stored in variable speech is the same instance as the literal String you've created between double quotes ("Hi", "Thanks", or "Bye").

Note also that I use the equalsIgnoreCase() call on the literal String I'm declaring, rather than the variable that is assigned from the parameter. This way, if a speech == null, the method call is still valid ("Hi" will always be a String), and so you won't get a NullPointerException, and the flow will continue until the else branch.

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thanks a lot, this works! –  user2052015 Feb 18 '13 at 14:10
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The == will only be true if the Strings are the same object. Use:

if(speech.equals("Hi"))

or to match without case:

if(speech.equalsIgnoreCase("hi"))
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wheni do this, it gives an error "java.lang.NullPointerException".. –  user2052015 Feb 18 '13 at 13:22
2  
Then speech is null which you should check first. Or of course you can use if("Hi".equals(speech)) or if("hi".equalsIgnoreCase(speech)) ` –  mkl Feb 18 '13 at 13:49
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Try the following snippet:

Main.java

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<StringWithValue> stringList = new ArrayList<StringWithValue>();
        stringList.add(new StringWithValue("Hi", 1));
        stringList.add(new StringWithValue("Thanks", 2));
        stringList.add(new StringWithValue("Bye", 3));

        String speech = "Hi";
        int number = 0;

        for(StringWithValue swv : stringList){
            if(swv.getString().equals(speech)){
                number = swv.getValue();
                break;
            } else {
                number = -1;
        }

        System.out.println("The number for the speech is : " + number);
    }
}

StringWithValue.java

public class StringWithValue {
    private String string;
    private int value;

    public StringWithValue(String string, int value) {
        this.string = string;
        this.value = value;
    }

    public String getString() {
        return string;
    }

    public int getValue() {
        return value;
    }
}
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Could you not use an enum instead of your StringWithValue class? –  Edd Feb 18 '13 at 14:03
    
of course, with the same result, but in this case you can't just use the foreach to go through all the enum entries, so i prefer the way using a class and the foreach –  Matthias Posch Feb 18 '13 at 14:05
    
Yes, but you'd have the advantage of not having to write and maintain another class, and you could switch on it in Java 1.6 and earlier. –  Edd Feb 18 '13 at 14:08
    
depends on whether you have to run it with 1.6 and earlier. either way, you would also have to maintain the enum. –  Matthias Posch Feb 18 '13 at 14:11
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public static double number;

    if(speech=="hi")
    {
        number=1;
    }
    else if(speech=="thanks")
    {
        number=2;
    }
    else if(speech=="Bye")
    {
        number=0;
    }
    else
    {
        System.out.println("Word Not Found");
    }
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Unfortunately does not help :/ –  user2052015 Feb 18 '13 at 13:31
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