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If I put an Observable Collection inside a separate .cs (class) file and use it in my MainPage.xaml, how can I make it so that all the data stored inside that same Observable Collection is accessible from within a different XAML page at a later time?

E.g.

MyClass.cs:
public ObservableCollection<String> oC = new ObservableCollection<String>();

MainPage.xaml.cs:
// add to observable collection

SecondPage.xaml.cs:
// access and use data stored in ObservableCollection
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you just want this:

MyClass.cs:
public static ObservableCollection<String> oC = new ObservableCollection<String>();

MainPage.xaml.cs:
// add to observable collection

SecondPage.xaml.cs:
// access and use data stored in ObservableCollection

Once the oC is static, you can reference it again and again from any class / page.

If however you want to bind to it (since you cannot bind to fields OR to static properties in Windows 8 apps) you need to have that XAML page reference your static property in a simple property:

SecondPage.xaml.cs:
public static ObservableCollection<String> oC { get { return MyClass.oC; } }

I hope this makes sense!

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You can either declare the collection as a static member.

Or implement the singleton pattern.

When you bind to the collection in XAML, you will need to create an accessor in your view model.

public ObservableCollection<String> Accessor
{
  get
  {
    return MyClass.oC;
  }
}
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A simple way is to declare it static and access it via the type rather than an instance:

e.g.

class SomeClass 
{
    public static bool SomeBool = false;
}

class SomeOtherClass
{
    public void SomeMethod() 
    {
        Debug.Write(SomeClass.SomeBool); // Ouput = false
    }
}

Bear in mind that this observable will be static and therefore a single instance - any modifications to it will immediately be visible to all objects accessing it - this means if some code is iterating the observable and another tries to add/remove from it - the iterator will throw an exception

If this may be the case, consider an alternative or use locking to ensure single thread access to the collection

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Thank you @Charleh :) It was kind of embarrassing asking this question. Sometimes my memory just seems to take a vacation. –  Tommy Feb 18 '13 at 13:43
    
No need to be embarrassed, this is a great question to ask. I favor static classes myself for simple projects. I loosely refer to them as "services" like ProductService or PackageManager. They do all the heavy lifting and keep my ViewModels more slim. If your project becomes more complex and you find services starting to depend on other services, you might consider moving up to a true IoC container and dependency injection. But for most simple projects, static classes are a good minimal effective dose. –  Jared Bienz - MSFT Feb 18 '13 at 18:58

Well how about something like this. An everywhere accessible resource...

public class CollectionSrc
{
  public ObservableCollection<...> Col 
  { 
    get { return _col ?? (_col = new ObservableCollection<...>()); }
  }
}

In App.xaml

<ns:CollectionSrc x:Key="ColSrc" /> <!--ns .. the namespace of CollectionSrc-->

Now you can access ColSrc everywhere in the xaml code. E.g.

<ListBox ItemsSource={Binding Col, Source={StaticResource ColSrc}} />
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This pattern is good for simple objects that don't have any dependencies on other services and for which you don't need control over when it gets created (it will always get created on app load when the Xaml parser parses the App.xaml resources section). If you need more control over when the object gets created, or if you need to supply dependencies, the singleton and static options mentioned below are your better bet. Since the question was about a simple ObservableCollection, this method works well enough. –  Jared Bienz - MSFT Feb 18 '13 at 18:53
    
I'd say it's the best option in most cases. You can rename the CollectionSrc to ViewModelLocator and it will suddenly seem more familiar. Then you can also call it ServiceLocator and you are getting more to the patterns. Then you can modify your properties to use some sort of IoC (Inversion of Control) container so that the method to retrieve that collection is more customizable and you are in the design patterns nirvana. :) –  Filip Skakun Feb 18 '13 at 20:09
    
@JaredBienz-MSFT Hmm, I don't really get your point. I can also imagine a much more complex object, which shows a more sophisticated behavior. Can you show an example, for which my suggestion doesn't work? Additional advantage, my solution also works in older versions of SL, although it's not that much important in these days. ;o) –  DHN Feb 19 '13 at 7:54
    
@FilipSkakun Interesting point. Never thought about it, to use it as entry point for accessing the ViewModels or services. Thank for this hint. :o) –  DHN Feb 19 '13 at 7:57

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