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In a mercurial set up, I'd like to automatically tag certain builds based on continuous integration scripts. For example, a tag such as branchName-buildId whenever a build of a branch is deployed, or perhaps latest-stable whenever a build passes all integration tests.

However, I'm worried that the straightforward approach of simply calling hg tag will cause problems:

  • Some tags may be duplicate - i.e. latest-stable. I don't really care which build gets tagged in this situation, but I don't want any conflicts because a script can't resolve those.
  • Tags cause commits. However, this means that those commits need to be pushed and they need to be robust in the face of concurrent pushes by humans and other scripts. In particular, the automatic push can create additional heads, which is Not Good. But by the time the additional head is detected (at push) the local tag commit has already happened, and even though the new heads are likely trivially mergeable, sometimes tags cause conflicts.

How can I automatically let the CI server tag a build robustly? Here it's more important that the end result is consistent (i.e. that it doesn't mess up the CI server or the repo), and it's less important that tags are reliably applied in the face of duplicates or conflicts (which should be very unlikely anyhow).

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I think you're right to be cautious. Robots aren't always the best citizens, and can often do silly things.

What you end up doing depends on what you see the tags being used for. For example, if you only see the CI system using them, then I'd suggest keeping them local. No pull/push/merge issues at all.

Some tags may be duplicate - i.e. latest-stable. I don't really care which build gets tagged in this situation, but I don't want any conflicts because a script can't resolve those.

If a tag is already defined, and you call hg tag again, it will fail unless you force it, but what this does is add a newer, later definition of the same tag, and the latest one wins. On one hand this is good, because the merge is simple, but think about the case when you do:

hg update -r latest-stable
hg update -r latest-stable
hg update -r latest-stable
hg update -r latest-stable

Each time you'll update to the version you'll get a version before the tag was made (as normal), and at that version latest-stable will point to the previous latest-stable. The result is that this sequence of commands will move you back through time.

Hence I'd say it's better either to have unique tags (i.e. stable-2013-02-18) or tag in two commits; One that removes the old tag, and one to add the new one.

hg update -r latest-stable # You're now at the commit that removed the tag.
hg update -r latest-stable # This one will error because tag doesn't exist

Tags cause commits. However, this means that those commits need to be pushed and they need to be robust in the face of concurrent pushes by humans and other scripts. In particular, the automatic push can create additional heads, which is Not Good. But by the time the additional head is detected (at push) the local tag commit has already happened, and even though the new heads are likely trivially mergeable, sometimes tags cause conflicts.

The CI robot should tag; pull; merge (if necessary); push. If the merge fails, don't push, raise an alarm. If the push fails (i.e. there's been more changesets in the time it took to merge), pull and merge again. I'd just make sure your script is very explicit about the revisions it's merging. This process should leave you with no extra heads.

I believe Mercurial treats the .hgtags file differently for merging because it knows about the content, so conflicts should be very rare. Also, tag commits are, in general, easy to merge because all that changes is .hgtags, so a merge from the CI head should never conflict. The only reason it could is because someone else is using the same tag names as the CI server, and if they are doing that then they need to have honey poured on their keyboard so they can do any more damage.

The situation I can see causing problems is if you're doing CI tagging on multiple heads with the same tag names. e.g. Development and release branches both have CI run on them, both have tests-clean tags assigned, but to different revisions, and are then merged later. Solution is, don't do that.

Hope some of that is helpful.

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I can't very well keep them local to the CI as it executes many builds in parallel - i.e. there are many CI repos. I suppose I could have an intermediate "buffer" repo, but that makes the push/pull story a lot more complex (e.g. they'd still need to merge amongst each other). Also, it's quite nice for the devs to see which changesets are live where - and it's a shame to spend all this effort getting the infrastructure running, and have it all in mercurial but then not to go the last mile and actually communicate this info. – Eamon Nerbonne Feb 19 '13 at 10:15
    
when you go hg update latest-stable, mercurial doesn't look at the working copy tags but at the union of the tags of all heads. So there's no issue with iterative hg update latest-stable commands - that works fine. – Eamon Nerbonne Feb 19 '13 at 10:57
    
As to the merging: .hgtags is append only, and this means every tag change conflicts - not just changes to the same tag! So the various CI builders will conflict amongst each other; and if anyone else adds an unrelated tag that will conflict as well. Essentially what this means is that each tag edit needs to be serializable and atomic globally for trivial automated updates to work. – Eamon Nerbonne Feb 19 '13 at 11:09

If you care about history of builds then consider creating a named branch just for the build process. In Mercurial all tags from all branches are visible in whole repository.

If you don't care about history bookmarks should do the trick. Build process can set bookmark latest-stable after tests are run and then execute hg push --bookmark latest-stable to push that bookmark to the server.

In either way take you have to take care that you don't run tests on revisions which child has already been tested. Mercurial revsets are very powerful query language and should help.

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Yeah, I looked at bookmarks, and they look very attractive except for the fact that they're active by default. So if I update to latest-stable for example and make a commit, I'll implicitly have moved the bookmark! That is Not Good. I can't find a way to disable that behavior (except by explicitly deactivating it each and every time and convincing all developers to do so, and both of those things sound unlikely to work well in the long run). – Eamon Nerbonne Feb 19 '13 at 10:51
    
I already have a named branch for the build process, that's how the CI server knows what to deploy where and how to test (for instance). But the final choice about deployment is human, so not every changeset in that branch causes a deployment, only those that pass manual validation - and those I want to tag (or bookmark, or whatever). – Eamon Nerbonne Feb 19 '13 at 10:53

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