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Is this code legal in C? I'm getting an error for the & sign. I am using Eclipse C/C++ IDE for Ubuntu to make this process easier.

void is_done(int &flag , char* ptr)
{
    int i=0;
    for(i=0;i<3;i++)
    {
        if(*ptr[i][0]==*ptr[i][1]==*ptr[i][2]||*ptr[0][i]==*ptr[1][i]==*ptr[2][i])
        {
            flag=1;
            return;
        }
    }
    if(*ptr[0][0]==*ptr[1][1]==*ptr[2][2]||*ptr[0][2]==*ptr[1][1]==*ptr[2][0])
    {
        flag=1;
        return;
    }
}

GCC gives me an error:

expected ‘;’, ‘,’ or ‘)’ before ‘&’ token
ipttt.c /OS line 7  C/C++ Problem

I really don't understand this error.

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int &flag is legal C++, but not C. –  Flexo Feb 18 '13 at 13:57
    
References are a C++ concept! –  StoryTeller Feb 18 '13 at 13:57
    
@Flexo who to do it in C –  Yaser Jaradeh Feb 18 '13 at 13:58
3  
the reason you don't understand the error is because you said it's a C/C++ Problem, there is no C/C++ this is C++ code compiled as C thus the problem. Pass by reference doesn't exist in C. You have to pass the address in C to change the original content outside of the function. –  Mike Feb 18 '13 at 13:59
2  
Btw chained comparisons like a == b == c don't work in C or C++ like they do in Python. Use a == b && b == c instead. –  Kos Feb 18 '13 at 14:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no "pass by reference" in C: that's C++. The only option available in C to accomplish this is passing by pointer

void is_done(int *flag , char* ptr)
{
    ...
    *flag=1;
    ...
}

You also need && with these chains of ==: they compile, but they do not do what you want them to do:

// DOES NOT WORK !!!
if(*ptr[0][0]==*ptr[1][1]==*ptr[2][2]||*ptr[0][2]==*ptr[1][1]==*ptr[2][0])

You need this:

if((*ptr[0][0]==*ptr[1][1] && *ptr[0][0]==*ptr[2][2]) || (*ptr[0][2]==*ptr[1][1] && *ptr[0][2]==*ptr[2][0])) {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot @dasblinklight –  Yaser Jaradeh Feb 18 '13 at 14:01
    
@YaserJaradeh You are welcome! If an answer worked for you (not necessarily this one - all answers to this question are more or less similar) you may want to accept one of them by clicking the grey check mark next to it. This would tell others that you are no longer looking for an improved answer, and earn you a new badge on Stack Overflow. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 18 '13 at 14:24

C doesn't have references. Your code is C++. In C, you have to use pointers:

void is_done(int *flag , char* ptr)
{
    ...
    *flag = 1;
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot @Axel –  Yaser Jaradeh Feb 18 '13 at 14:00

References using the & character in declarations is a C++ thing. To pass "objects" as a reference in C you have to use pointers:

void is_done(int *flag , char* ptr)
{
    ...

    *flag = 1;

    ...
}
share|improve this answer

What you wanted was to pass a pointer to an int like this:

void is_done(int *flag , char* ptr)
{
            // Then you must deference the variable to set the value
    *flag = 1; // or whatever value you want

Then you'd call your function with the flag like this:

int main()
{
   int flag = 0;
   char * ptr = NULL;
   ...
   is_done(&flag, ptr);  // Note that's not "reference" here, that's the address of
                         // your local flag variable

Of course you could just use a pointer, but since you were trying to "pass by reference" I assume you were not using a pointer in your code to begin with.

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