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What is the equivalent in Java of this code?I have put a portion of it and I am interested in the I/O part:

int fd = open(FILE_NAME, O_WRONLY);  
int ret = 0;  
if (fd == -1) {         
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);  
}  
while (1) {  
    ret = write(fd, "\0", 1);  
}  

Update:
The code does not copy files.It only writes a byte (?)/char(?) (not sure what) in the file every X seconds

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is basically what you want.

try {
  FileOutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(FILENAME);
  while( true ){
     os.write(0);
     Thread.sleep(2000);  // wait 2 seconds before the next write
  }
}
catch( FileNotFoundException e ){
  System.err.println("watchdog error: " + e.getMessage())
  System.exit(1);
}

If you really want to ignore all "write" errors as your C code does, then change the os.write to:

try {
  os.write(0);
}
catch( Exception we ){
  //ignoring write exception 
}
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So "\0" is replaced with an integer 0? –  Jim Feb 18 '13 at 14:39
    
You can use \u0000 for the null character –  Mr Spoon Feb 18 '13 at 14:45
    
It is a character device.Does this change something? –  Jim Feb 18 '13 at 14:56
    
Actually "\0" is a String object. It should be '\0' (as a char), or 0 (as an int). Note that char is widened to int without requiring an explicit cast. docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-5.html#jls-5.1.2 –  Javier Feb 18 '13 at 15:00
    
@Javier:The device is character device.So 0 and \0 are the same? –  Jim Feb 18 '13 at 15:02
public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException, InterruptedException {
    //open the file (throws exception if failed)
    FileOutputStream fstream = new FileOutputStream("fName"); 

    while (true) {
         //write "\0" in the file (throws exception if failed)
         fstream.write(0); 
         //sleep for 1000ms, throw exception if interrupted
         Thread.sleep(1000);
     }
 }
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1  
Why cast to byte? –  Jim Feb 18 '13 at 14:46
    
Good point, it is write(int). I thought it was write(byte) –  Javier Feb 18 '13 at 14:50
    
It is a character device.Does this change something? –  Jim Feb 18 '13 at 14:56
    
No. It was a redundant cast. –  Javier Feb 18 '13 at 15:07
Filereader file = new Filereader("filename");
BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader();
String line = "";

FileWriter fstream = new FileWriter("fName");
BufferedWriter fbw = new BufferedWriter(fstream);

while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {

    fbw.write(line + "\n");

}

You mean something like this? Read from one file and write to another file.

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The code in OP does not copy files –  Jim Feb 18 '13 at 14:33

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