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If I chain continuations together they appear to be executing in an order I wasn't expecting.

For example:

for (int i = 1; i < 6; i++)
{
    HttpRequestMessage request = new HttpRequestMessage();

    Task<JsonResult<MyResult>> message = Task.Factory.StartNew<HttpResponseMessage>(() =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine(i + " started");
            return client.SendAsync(request).Result;
        })
        .ContinueWith<JsonResult<MyResult>>((r) =>
            {
                var stringresult = r.Result.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result;
                var deserialized = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<JsonResult<MyResult>>(stringresult);
                Console.WriteLine(deserialized.Id + " deserialized");
                return deserialized;
            })
        .ContinueWith<JsonResult<MyResult>>(m =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine(m.Id + " completed");
                return m.Result;
            });

}

Now I'd expect to see the different requests interleaved, which I do, but I'm expecting to see each individual process execute in the order: started, deserialized, completed. However, sometimes the 'completed' continuation executes before the deserialization continuation, like so:

1 started
2 started
3 started
4 started
1 deserialized, length: 69
1 completed
5 started
5 deserialized, length: 831
2 completed
4 deserialized, length: 1022
3 completed
3 deserialized, length: 356
4 completed
2 deserialized, length: 878
5 completed

What am I missing here?

Edit:

Yes I know about the closure, the real code is much longer, and of course handles this, but I stripped out the guff that I didn't think was pertinent to the question, and then everyone goes and focuses on the missing guff!! It doesn't change the question or the issue I'm seeing.

share|improve this question
4  
Is this your real code? I'm asking this because you're making the widespread mistake of closing over the loop variable. blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/11/12/… This could lead to printing "5 started" multiple times. – Henrik Feb 18 '13 at 14:56
2  
I suspect some buffering/locking in Console.WriteLine(). Try adding a Stopwatch and printing StopWatch.ElapsedTicks to see if it really is doing what you think. – Matthew Watson Feb 18 '13 at 15:09
7  
Your code does not match the result. e.g. there is no length printed in the code. Also, the id:s printed are messed up. The first one prints the loop index, the second one prints something from the deserialization and the third prints the task id. You are not comparing the same thing – adrianm Feb 18 '13 at 15:11
2  
Since the code you've shown doesn't include a length in its WriteLine calls, it's possible that you've obscured the actual issue when anonymizing the code. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 18 '13 at 15:12
1  
You also seem to have not gathered the intent of async programming. You're doing a blocking wait on all of your async calls. There is no value added in using your continuations you're using. This is entirely synchronous code that just appears to be asynchronous. – Servy Feb 18 '13 at 15:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So your largest problem is that you are doing a synchronous wait on all of your async operations (SendAsync and ReadAsStringAsync). You're just doing these synchronous waits in a background thread. There is no value gained from your ContinueWith calls at all, since all of your continuations have no asynchronous components to them. You might as well just have your entire code inside of the original StartWith call; putting it in a continuation gains you nothing.

Here is an example of your program, but without the synchronous waits on the async operations:

for (int i = 1; i < 6; i++)
{
    HttpRequestMessage request = new HttpRequestMessage();

    int id = i;
    Console.WriteLine("{0} started", id);
    var result = client.SendAsync(request)
        .ContinueWith(t =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} reading", id);
            return t.Result.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
        })
        .Unwrap()
        .ContinueWith(t =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} read", id);
            var deserialized = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<JsonResult<MyResult>>(t.Result);
            Console.WriteLine("{0} deserialized", id);
            return deserialized;
        });
}

Also note that one problem in the code that you showed us is that you were not consistently using the same identifying number when logging to the console. I have used the loop variable throughout, to keep it clear. I also make sure to take a copy of the loop variable so that I'm not closing over the loop variable. I also log slightly different things that should result in more interesting results.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for an answer that doesn't focus on the closed variable!! Where are the synchronous waits? – MalcomTucker Feb 18 '13 at 20:26
    
@MalcomTucker In your code? The two calls to Result. Result returns the result of the task, but if the task is not yet done it performs a blocking wait until the task finishes, so that it can get the result. In both of those occasions you should be using ContinueWith instead so that you don't call Result until the task finishes, but without doing a blocking wait. – Servy Feb 18 '13 at 20:28
    
We're getting somewhere - the completed continuation is executing before the deserialization has finished. But why? – MalcomTucker Feb 18 '13 at 20:55
    
@MalcomTucker No, it's not. I can assure you that it's not, unless your code is nothing like what's posted here, in which case who knows what's going on. – Servy Feb 18 '13 at 20:57
    
The code is as above. So I'm confused. – MalcomTucker Feb 18 '13 at 21:03

You are not comparing the same id:s in your printout. Try changing the last continuation into

        .ContinueWith<JsonResult<MyResult>>(m =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine(m.Result.Id + " completed");
            return m.Result;
        });

so you at least compare the same id in the continuations.

share|improve this answer
    
The result Id is passed into the request (code not shown) so they are exactly the same ids. – MalcomTucker Feb 18 '13 at 20:12

As @Henrik says, by the time the thread runs, the value of i will have changed. This will make determining the order that the threads are actually running in look incorrect.

Try maybe passing the i in to the function:

  Task<JsonResult<MyResult>> message = Task.Factory.StartNew<HttpRequestMessage>(state =>  {

            Console.WriteLine(state.ToString() + " started");
            return client.SendAsync(request).Result;
        }, i )
            .ContinueWith<JsonResult<MyResult>>((r) =>
            {
                var stringresult = r.Result.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result;
                var deserialized = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<JsonResult<MyResult>>(stringresult);
                Console.WriteLine(deserialized.Id + " deserialized");
                return deserialized;
            })
            .ContinueWith<JsonResult<MyResult>>(m =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine(m.Id + " completed");
                return m.Result;
            });
share|improve this answer
    
I know about the closure, it's all handled. The question still stands regardless - why are the continuations executed out of sequence? – MalcomTucker Feb 18 '13 at 20:12

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